State: ‘Virtually every foreign leader’ concerned with 2016 GOP

State: ‘Virtually every foreign leader’ concerned with 2016 GOP
© Getty Images

The State Department on Monday claimed that government leaders from around the world have expressed alarm to Secretary of State John KerryJohn KerryAs Congress adjusts to Trump, Iran put under the pressure it deserves Sharpton pressures Dems on Trump nominees Words are not enough — US must support Christians who survived genocide in Iraq MORE in recent weeks over harsh comments from Republican presidential candidates.

"Virtually every foreign leader the secretary meets with expresses concerns about the campaign rhetoric here in the United States, and expresses a fair bit of angst about where things are going,” department spokesman John Kirby told reporters. 

ADVERTISEMENT
“The very stark rhetoric that continues to emerge from the campaign is not being ignored by foreign leaders and foreign governments and foreign populations,” he added.

Kirby’s comments came a day after Kerry said publicly that the rhetoric out of the GOP presidential race is an “embarrassment” to the U.S.

"Everywhere I go, every leader I meet, they ask about what is happening in America. They cannot believe it," Kerry said on CBS's "Face The Nation.”

"I think it is fair to say that they're shocked."

Kirby maintained that Kerry was not talking about one candidate in particular, but that “a wide swath of views” from the campaign trail “have caused concern.”

Donald TrumpDonald TrumpDem urges Biden to run for DNC chair As Congress adjusts to Trump, Iran put under the pressure it deserves Real estate agency promotes Secret Service as Trump Tower amenity MORE, the GOP front-runner, has been repeatedly scrutinized for his unconventional foreign policy positions, which include questioning of core U.S. alliances, tough new tariffs on overseas trading partners and a temporary ban on Muslim travelers to the U.S. The comments have unnerved fellow Republicans, and caused multiple prominent former GOP officials to claim that they would consider voting for Democratic front-runner Hillary ClintonHillary Rodham ClintonTop Dem super PAC launches anti-Trump war room Omarosa: Trump will help women 'shatter the glass ceiling' Flynn's son 'is no longer involved in transition efforts' MORE to keep Trump out of the White House.

GOP rival Ted CruzTed CruzSenate GOP: National museum should include Clarence Thomas Senate GOP to Obama: Stop issuing new rules Week ahead: AT&T-Time Warner merger under scrutiny MORE, meanwhile, has been criticized for proposing that U.S. law enforcement agencies "patrol and secure" Muslim communities in the wake of last week's terror attack in Brussels.

The campaign rhetoric was not yet having an impact on the U.S.’s engagement with other countries, Kirby said.