Senate committee to question Kushner over Russian meetings: report

Senate committee to question Kushner over Russian meetings: report
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The Senate Intelligence Committee will reportedly question White House adviser Jared Kushner as part of its probe into Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election.

The committee wants to question Kushner, who is also President Trump's son-in-law, about meetings he arranged with Russian Ambassador Sergey Kislyak, The New York Times reported.

According to the Times, the White House counsel's office was told this month about the panel's request.

A White House official and a spokesman for Intelligence Committee chair Richard BurrRichard Mauze BurrOvernight Energy: Chemical safety regulator's nomination at risk | Watchdog scolds Zinke on travel records | Keystone pipeline spills 210,000 gallons of oil Overnight Regulation: Senators unveil bipartisan gun background check bill | FCC rolls back media regs | Family leave credit added to tax bill | Senate confirms banking watchdog Collins ‘leaning against’ Trump EPA chemical nominee MORE (R-N.C.) confirmed to the Wall Street Journal that Kushner had agreed to meet. 

“Throughout the campaign and transition, Jared Kushner served as the official primary point of contact with foreign governments and officials. Given this role, he has volunteered to speak with Chairman Burr’s Committee,” a White House official told the Journal. 

The White House has previously acknowledged a December meeting at Trump Tower between Kushner, Kislyak and former national security adviser Michael Flynn. Discussions at that meeting reportedly focused on the potential of better relations between the U.S. and Russia.

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The Times reported that Kislyak had requested a second meeting, and Kushner sent a deputy in his place. Kislyak requested that meeting to "deliver a message," White House spokeswoman Hope Hicks said. During that meeting, the Russian ambassador said he wanted Kushner to meet with Sergey Gorkov, the chief of Vnesheconombank, a Russian state-owned development bank that was placed under U.S. sanctions.

Kushner met with Gorkov at a later date.

"It really wasn't much of a conversation," Hicks said.

Hicks told the Times that nothing of significance was discussed.

Hicks added that Kushner had met with dozens of foreign officials and noted he is open to speaking with Senate investigators.

"He isn't trying to hide anything," she said.

Last week, FBI Director James Comey confirmed the bureau is investigating Russian attempts to interfere in the 2016 presidential election, including any links or coordination between members of Trump's campaign and Moscow.

--This report was updated at 11:29 a.m.