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Justice names special counsel for Russia investigation

 

The Justice Department has appointed former FBI director Robert MuellerRobert Swan MuellerSasse: US should applaud choice of Mueller to lead Russia probe MORE as special counsel to investigate Russia's involvement in the U.S. election, a momentous step that darkens the legal cloud hanging over President TrumpDonald John TrumpHouse Republicans push Mulvaney, Trump to rescind Gateway funds Pruitt spent K flying aides to Australia to prep for later-canceled visit: report Rosenstein told Trump he is not a target of Mueller probe: report MORE’s White House.

Deputy Attorney General Rod RosensteinRod Jay RosensteinRosenstein told Trump he is not a target of Mueller probe: report Justice to provide access to Comey memos to GOP lawmakers Judge questions whether DOJ gave Mueller too much power MORE announced the appointment of Mueller, a former prosecutor who served 12 years at the helm of the FBI and is respected on both sides of the aisle. 

"In my capacity as acting attorney general I determined that it is in the public interest for me to exercise my authority and appoint a special counsel to assume responsibility for the matter," Rosenstein said in a statement, according to The Washington Post. 

"My decision is not a finding that crimes have been committed or that any prosecution is warranted. I have made no such determination. What I have determined is that based upon the unique circumstances, the public interest requires me to place this investigation under the authority of a person who exercises a degree of independence from the normal chain of command."

Rosenstein had been under fierce pressure from Democrats — and in the last 24 hours, a few Republicans — to appoint a special counsel in the wake of Trump’s dismissal of former FBI Director James ComeyJames Brien ComeyJustice to provide access to Comey memos to GOP lawmakers Judge questions whether DOJ gave Mueller too much power Justice Dept inspector asks US attorney to consider criminal charges for McCabe: reports MORE

Trump was interviewing potential replacements for Comey at the White House when the news of Mueller’s appointment broke.

“As I have stated many times, a thorough investigation will confirm what we already know — there was no collusion between my campaign and any foreign entity.  I look forward to this matter concluding quickly,” Trump said in a statement. “In the meantime, I will never stop fighting for the people and the issues that matter most to the future of our country. 

The calls for a special counsel reached a fever pitch in the wake of a Tuesday report that Trump had urged Comey to "let go" of the investigation into his former national security advisor Michael Flynn — a request that Comey reportedly documented in a memo that is now being sought by Congress.

Trump fired Comey last week, a decision the president has publicly linked to the bureau’s investigation of Russia, which includes exploring any coordination between the Trump campaign and Russia to help swing the election. 

Rosenstein had authored a memo on Comey’s conduct in office that the White House had used to justify the firing — something that reportedly frustrated Rosenstein, a career prosecutor whose integrity was suddenly called into question. 

The Rosenstein memo, which stopped short of explicitly recommending Comey's firing, laid out a series of critiques of his handling of the investigation into Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonJustice to provide access to Comey memos to GOP lawmakers Justice Dept inspector asks US attorney to consider criminal charges for McCabe: reports 'Homeland' to drop Trump allegories in next season MORE's private email server. 

The president later said that he had decided to fire Comey irrespective of Rosenstein's recommendation.

Since Comey’s dismissal, an increasing number of Republicans had expressed openness to some form of new investigation, whether it come in the form of a special prosecutor appointed by the Justice Department, a special congressional committee or an independent commission. 

Mueller’s appointment could take some of the heat off congressional Republicans, who were coming under intense pressure to respond to the drumbeat of revelations about Trump’s conduct. Senate Intelligence Committee member James LankfordJames Paul LankfordOvernight Cybersecurity: US, UK blame Russia for global cyberattacks | Top cyber official leaving White House | Zuckerberg to meet EU digital chief Senators, state officials to meet on election cybersecurity bill Trump administration to brief senators on Syria strikes MORE (R-Okla.) called Rosenstein’s decision “positive,” and other Republicans issued similar praise.

"Robert Mueller is an exceptional public servant,” Sen. Ben SasseBenjamin (Ben) Eric SasseLonger sentences won’t stop the opioid epidemic Overnight Finance: Trump floats entering Pacific trade pact he once called 'a disaster' | Senators worry over Mulvaney's power at consumer bureau | Battle for CFPB control heads to appeals court | House fails to pass balanced budget amendment Trump to explore entering Pacific trade pact he once called 'a disaster' MORE (R-Neb.) said in a statement. “His record, character, and trustworthiness have been lauded for decades by Republicans and Democrats alike." 

Democrats, who have denounced Trump’s actions as obstruction of justice, were giddy at the news.

“I'm surprised and thrilled. I can't think of anybody with more integrity and who will have as much credibility within the FBI as Bob Mueller,” said Rep. Jim HimesJames (Jim) Andres HimesDem lawmaker: People will 'rot in hell' for attacking Mueller and Comey Dem rep: To call Mueller probe a witch hunt is ‘to be completely unhinged’ Overnight Cybersecurity: House Intel votes to release Russia report | House lawmakers demand Zuckerberg testify | Senators unveil updated election cyber bill MORE (D-Conn.), who sits on the House Intelligence Committee. “This is a master stroke, I think, by the deputy attorney."

Rosenstein will have a chance to explain his decision to lawmakers on Thursday morning, when he is set to brief the full Senate — a previously scheduled appearance related to the controversy over Comey’s dismissal.

The decision about appointing a special counsel fell to Rosenstein because Attorney General Jeff SessionsJefferson (Jeff) Beauregard SessionsAppeals court rules against Trump effort to hit 'sanctuary cities' Justice Dept inspector asks US attorney to consider criminal charges for McCabe: reports Poll: Almost two-thirds of Texas voters support legal recreational marijuana MORE recused himself from the Russia matter earlier this year after failing to disclose a meeting with Russian ambassador Sergey Kislyac during testimony to the Senate. 

Mueller will have broad powers to conduct the investigation, which has been underway at the FBI for months and appears to be focused heavily on several figures who were prominent in the Trump campaign, including Flynn and former campaign manager Paul ManafortPaul John ManafortJustice Dept lawyer says Manafort may have served as 'back channel' to Russia: report Schiff pushes bill to review any Trump pardons in Russia probe Dems press for hearings after Libby pardon MORE

Before his firing, Comey had reportedly asked Rosenstein for more prosecutors to pursue the Russia investigation.

While Mueller will have broader authority to run the investigation autonomously than a U.S. attorney, he will still answer to Rosenstein, who ultimately answers to the president.

Appointed by George W. Bush, Mueller is a revered figure within the FBI. He is credited with shepherding the FBI into its modern iteration, rebuffing post-9/11 calls to break up the FBI and create a separate domestic intelligence agency.  

He directly preceded Comey in office, serving two additional years at the helm of the agency at the request of President Obama. He left office in 2013.

Mueller will resign from his private law firm to avoid any conflicts of interest, according to the Justice Department.

Several Democrats on Wednesday argued that the appointment of Mueller does not supplant the need for an outside panel, to complement the DOJ probe and those in Congress. 

Rep. Adam KinzingerAdam Daniel KinzingerRepublicans express doubts that Ryan can stay on as Speaker Bernie Sanders: Trump has no authority to broaden war in Syria GOP rep: Trump doesn’t need congressional approval for military action in Syria MORE (R-Ill.), who applauded the appointment of Mueller, pushed back against the Democrats’ argument.

“If we want to start popping up all kinds of different investigations everywhere, this is never going to get solved. And it’s literally just going to be that: a political talking point for the next [election] cycle,” he said. “This is beyond what it just means for Republicans and Democrats.

— Jordan Fabian and Mike Lillis contributed.