Flynn to decline Senate subpoena, invoke Fifth Amendment: report

Former national security adviser Michael Flynn will invoke his Fifth Amendment rights and not comply with a Senate Intelligence Committee subpoena, the Associated Press reported Monday. 

Flynn was subpoenaed in the committee’s investigation into Russian meddling and potential ties between President Trump’s campaign and Russian officials.

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Flynn previously offered to testify before the Senate and House Intelligence committees in exchange for immunity, but neither committee accepted the offer. 

Flynn was fired from his post as national security adviser in February for misleading Vice President Mike PenceMike (Michael) Richard PenceGOP senator: Don't expect Trump to 'have your back' on healthcare vote Sanders: GOP healthcare bill 'barbaric and immoral' Four GOP senators will vote against taking up healthcare bill without changes MORE and other White House officials about conversations with Russian Ambassador Sergey Kislyak. Russian officials reportedly bragged during the 2016 campaign that they could use Flynn to influence Trump in the White House. 

Flynn has come under scrutiny for lobbying work he did on behalf of the Turkish government during last year’s election. He reportedly delayed an Islamic State attack plan that Turkey opposed during Trump’s transition. 

Last week, Senate Intelligence Committee Chairman Richard BurrRichard BurrSenate intel panel to hold hearing on Russian meddling in Europe The Hill's Whip List: Senate ObamaCare repeal bill Overnight Tech: Uber CEO resigns | Trump's Iowa tech trip | Dems push Sessions to block AT&T-Time Warner deal | Lawmakers warned on threat to election systems | MORE (R-N.C.) said that Flynn was “not cooperating” so far with the committee’s investigation, but that he hadn’t received a “definitive” answer on whether Flynn would testify.

Flynn is one of a series of former Trump associates who have been asked by the committee to turn over documents and records on any dealings with Russia. 

Trump’s former foreign policy adviser Carter Page, informal adviser Roger Stone and former campaign chairman Paul Manafort were also asked to provide documents.

As of last week, the committee had received two responses, according to Burr. One of these, Page, is publicly known. Burr declined to reveal the second.  

— Updated at 10:09 a.m.