Cell phones helped a quarter of Americans participate in the midterms

A quarter of Americans used their cell phones to participate in the midterm elections, according to a Pew report released on Thursday. 

That included calling their friends to say they had voted and checking the results with a wireless connection, among other activities.

Here is an excerpt from the report that explains how Americans used their cell phones to take part in the political process:

• 14 percent of all American adults used their cell phones to tell others that they had voted.

• 12 percent of adults used their cell phones to keep up with news about the election or politics.

• 10 percent of adults sent text messages relating to the election to friends, family members and others.

• 6 percent of adults used their cells to let others know about conditions at their local voting stations on election day, including insights about delays, long lines, low turnout or other issues.

• 4 percent of adults used their phones to monitor results of the election as they occurred.

• 3 percent of adults used their cells to shoot and share photos or videos related to the election.

• 1 percent of adults used a cell phone app that provided updates from a candidate or group about election news.    

• 1 percent of adults contributed money by text message to a candidate or group connected to the election like a party or interest group.

Read the full report here.