Senate turf war brewing over web privacy

The leaders of the Senate Commerce Committee sent a clear message to the Judiciary Committee this week: Online privacy is our territory.

Commerce chairman Jay RockefellerJohn (Jay) Davison RockefellerSenate GOP rejects Trump’s call to go big on gun legislation Overnight Tech: Trump nominates Dem to FCC | Facebook pulls suspected baseball gunman's pages | Uber board member resigns after sexist comment Trump nominates former FCC Dem for another term MORE (D-W.Va.) and ranking member Kay Bailey Hutchison (R-Texas) took the unusual step of writing to the Senate Judiciary Committee expressing their opinion that the Commerce Committee is the natural home of any online privacy legislation.

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At issue is the announcement from Judiciary chairman Patrick LeahyPatrick Joseph LeahyFBI has no excuse to hide future scandals from American public Live coverage: FBI chief, Justice IG testify on critical report Student rips DeVos at school safety commission for failure to take on guns MORE (D-Vt.) last month regarding the formation of a new Subcommittee on Privacy, Technology and Law with Sen. Al FrankenAlan (Al) Stuart FrankenThe Hill's Morning Report — Sponsored by PhRMA — GOP lawmakers race to find an immigration fix Richard Painter puts out 'dumpster fire' in first campaign ad Bill Clinton says 'norms have changed' in society for what 'you can do to somebody against their will' MORE (D-Minn.) serving as chairman and Sen. Tom CoburnThomas (Tom) Allen CoburnMr. President, let markets help save Medicare Pension insolvency crisis only grows as Congress sits on its hands Paul Ryan should realize that federal earmarks are the currency of cronyism MORE (R-Okla.) as ranking member.

According to the subcommittee's website, the panel will focus on providing oversight of privacy issues related to social networks, online advertising and emerging technologies, among other areas.

That rankled Commerce committee members, who have already begun work crafting online privacy legislation under Rockefeller's leadership. The incident demonstrates the growing importance of online privacy as a consumer and political issue that touches the lives of the majority of Americans.

"We are concerned about the description of the Subcommittee on the Judiciary Committee website and are puzzled insofar as the jurisdiction described appears to be beyond the scope of the jurisdiction of the Judiciary Committee under the Senate Rule XXV," wrote Sens. Rockefeller and Hutchison.

"Legislation related to such matters lie squarely within the jurisdiction of the Senate Commerce, Science and Transportation Committee...As you undoubtedly know, the Senate Commerce Committee  for many years has focused on attention on the need to protect consumers' privacy interests."

Sources told Hillicon that Commerce staffers were blindsided by the announcement of the new subcommittee without first discussing how the new subpanel would coordinate with Commerce on privacy issues.

But a Judiciary aide said Commerce was taking a narrow view of privacy as solely a consumer issue and said there is clearly a role for the Judiciary Committee in privacy-related issues.

The aide noted Judiciary considered privacy legislation as recently as the data privacy bill from Sens. Leahy and Orrin HatchOrrin Grant HatchOn The Money — Sponsored by Prudential — Senators hammers Ross on Trump tariffs | EU levies tariffs on US goods | Senate rejects Trump plan to claw back spending Senators hammer Ross over Trump tariffs Top Finance Dem wants panel to investigate Trump Foundation MORE (R-Utah) in the last Congress and was adamant that Judiciary coordinates with Commerce frequently on privacy and other related issues and will continue to do so in the future.

Sen. Franken's office declined to comment on Friday, deferring to Sen. Leahy. Leahy's office said he was traveling on Friday and therefore unable to review the letter and issue a comment.