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ACLU asks how police use cellphone location data

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“The public has a right to know how and under what circumstances their location information is being accessed by the government,” said Catherine Crump, staff attorney for the ACLU. “A detailed history of someone's movements is extremely personal and is the kind of information the Constitution protects.”

The ACLU requested information on how often police obtain cellphone location data and how much money they spend tracking cellphones. The requests also asked whether police demonstrate probable cause and obtain a warrant before accessing the data.

Apple came under scrutiny after reports in April revealed iPhones store data on their locations.

Last month, Matthew Olsen, nominated to head the National Counterterrorism Center, told a Senate panel that the government might have the authority under the PATRIOT Act to track Americans using their cellphone data.

Sen. Ron WydenRonald (Ron) Lee WydenOvernight Health Care: Trump eases rules on insurance outside ObamaCare | HHS office on religious rights gets 300 complaints in a month | GOP chair eyes opioid bill vote by Memorial Day Trump eases rules on insurance sold outside of ObamaCare Grassley, Dems step up battle over judicial nominees MORE (D-Ore.) and Rep. Jason ChaffetzJason ChaffetzTrump, GOP at new crossroads on deficit Chaffetz: Spending vote means GOP 'lost every single bit of credibility' on debt Let’s not fail in our second chance to protect Bears Ears MORE (R-Utah) introduced bills in June to create guidelines for when the government can track cellphone data. 

Also in June, Sens. Al FrankenAlan (Al) Stuart FrankenShould the Rob Porter outcome set the standard? Grassley, Dems step up battle over judicial nominees Sen. Gillibrand, eyeing 2020 bid, rankles some Democrats MORE (D-Minn.) and Richard Blumenthal (D-Conn.) introduced a measure that would require firms such as Apple and Google along with app developers to obtain consent before collecting or sharing consumers' location data.