ACLU asks how police use cellphone location data

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“The public has a right to know how and under what circumstances their location information is being accessed by the government,” said Catherine Crump, staff attorney for the ACLU. “A detailed history of someone's movements is extremely personal and is the kind of information the Constitution protects.”

The ACLU requested information on how often police obtain cellphone location data and how much money they spend tracking cellphones. The requests also asked whether police demonstrate probable cause and obtain a warrant before accessing the data.

Apple came under scrutiny after reports in April revealed iPhones store data on their locations.

Last month, Matthew Olsen, nominated to head the National Counterterrorism Center, told a Senate panel that the government might have the authority under the PATRIOT Act to track Americans using their cellphone data.

Sen. Ron WydenRonald (Ron) Lee WydenSenate Dems hold floor talk-a-thon against latest ObamaCare repeal bill Overnight Defense: Senate passes 0B defense bill | 3,000 US troops heading to Afghanistan | Two more Navy officials fired over ship collisions Finance to hold hearing on ObamaCare repeal bill MORE (D-Ore.) and Rep. Jason ChaffetzJason ChaffetzFive memorable moments from Hillary Clinton’s newest book Clinton says she mistook Chaffetz for Priebus at Trump's inauguration Curtis wins GOP primary for House seat vacated by Jason Chaffetz MORE (R-Utah) introduced bills in June to create guidelines for when the government can track cellphone data. 

Also in June, Sens. Al FrankenAlan (Al) Stuart FrankenGOP eying 'blue slip' break to help Trump fill the courts Overnight Regulation: FTC launches probe into Equifax | Dems propose tougher data security rules | NYC aims to slash greenhouse gas emissions | EPA to reconsider Obama coal ash rule Overnight Cybersecurity: Kaspersky to testify before House | US sanctions Iranians over cyberattacks | Equifax reveals flaw that led to hack MORE (D-Minn.) and Richard Blumenthal (D-Conn.) introduced a measure that would require firms such as Apple and Google along with app developers to obtain consent before collecting or sharing consumers' location data.