OVERNIGHT TECH: FCC pushes for tablet computers in schools

Companies participating in the meeting included Apple, Discovery Education, Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, Intel, McGraw-Hill, News Corp., Samsung, Sprint and T-Mobile.

FCC hands over LightSquared files: The FCC provided thousands of internal documents late Wednesday to House Republicans who are investigating LightSquared.

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The records given to the House Energy and Commerce Committee are related to the FCC's review of the wireless start-up. Republicans have questioned whether the company received special treatment from the Obama administration.

The FCC granted LightSquared a conditional waiver last year to move forward with plans for a nationwide 4G network, but the agency now plans to block the network after tests showed it would interfere with GPS devices, including ones used by airplane pilots.

Sen. Chuck Grassley (R-Iowa) has pledged to block a vote on the president's two FCC nominees, Ajit Pai and Jessica Rosenworcel, until he receives the FCC's records on LightSquared. 

The FCC declined to provide any documents to Grassley, citing a policy against responding to requests from lawmakers who do not serve on committees with jurisdiction over the agency. But Rep. Greg Walden (R-Ore.), one of the lawmakers leading the House's probe, has said he plans to share any documents he receives from the FCC with Grassley. 

A spokeswoman for Grassley said she was aware the House had received the documents but that her office has not received any copies yet. She added that it is unclear whether the FCC plans to release more documents or whether this will be the only batch.


IN CASE YOU MISSED IT:

House Republicans expressed strong skepticism about the need for online privacy regulations at a hearing, with one lawmaker warning it could lead to “big-government rules of the road.”

An independent investigation of the conditions in Chinese factories that produce Apple products found "serious and pressing" violations of workplace codes and Chinese law.

The Obama administration plans to invest $200 million to research new technologies to manage and sift through large volumes of digital data.

The American Conservative Union is urging Congress to protect the retransmission consent fees that are charged by broadcasters.