Lawmakers push cyber law after JPMorgan hack

Lawmakers are calling for action on cybersecurity legislation following news that 76 million household accounts were affected in a massive hack at JPMorgan Chase.

Though Congress has so far been unable to advance major cybersecurity legislation, some lawmakers said that should change.

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“The longer we wait to take action, the more vulnerable we become, and as we've seen today, Americans will pay the price,” Sen. Angus KingAngus KingSenators to Obama: Make 'timely' call on Afghan troops levels Lawmakers push to elevate Cyber Command in Senate defense bill House, Senate at odds on new authority for cyber war unit MORE (I-Maine) said in a statement late on Thursday, after the Wall Street giant disclosed that information about 76 million household accounts and 7 million small business accounts had been stolen.

“Congress must work to pass legislation that will improve our capabilities and protect us against more attacks like these,” King added. “The next Pearl Harbor will be cyber, and shame on us if we're not prepared for it.”

Hackers stole people’s names, addresses and other contact information, but not account data or passwords, the bank said.

Sen. Ed MarkeyEd MarkeyHonor Frank Lautenberg by protecting our kids Sanders pans chemical safety reform deal Feds fault pipeline company in California oil spill MORE (D-Mass.) called the hack “yet another example of how Americans’ most sensitive personal information is in danger.”

"It is time to pass legislation to protect Americans against these massive data breaches,” he added.

Rep. Yvette Clarke (D-N.Y.) tweeted that the U.S. “must keep up on cybersecurity.”

Congress has looked to pass some type of anti-hacking bill for years.

The effort got a boost nearly a year ago, after a major data breach at Target compromised 40 million shoppers’ credit and debit cards. But subsequent attacks at other outlets — including this summer’s theft of 56 million people’s card data from Home Depot — has yet to result in legislation.

With Congress scheduled to hold only a short session after the November elections, the issue is likely to go unaddressed until at least next year.