Cruz: Obama immigration action would be 'defiant of voters'

 

Sen. Ted CruzTed CruzMeet the billionaire donor behind Hulk Hogan’s lawsuit against Gawker Party chairs see reversal of fortune McConnell: Trump White House will have ‘constraints’ MORE (R-Texas) on Friday characterized President Obama's planned executive action on immigration as "angry and defiant of voters" following Republican wins in the midterm elections. 

"I hope he does not do so. If he does, it would be wrong, it would be unconstitutional, and it would be angry and defiant of voters," Cruz said Friday, following a speech in Austin outlining his position on a number of issues related to technology policy. 

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The Texas senator said if Obama goes through with the plan, "Congress will do everything humanly possible to stop them.” He declined to "game play" what tactics Republicans might use. 

Cruz said he might even agree with some of the policy changes that Obama makes, including freeing up more work visas for the technology community. He noted that he has introduced a bill to expand the cap on high-tech visas. 

An expansion of the cap was also included in a comprehensive Senate bill passed by the chamber last year, which stalled in the House.  

"As a policy matter, I may well agree with that, but even so, the way to do it is not the president unilaterally decreeing, ‘I'm changing the law,’ " Cruz said. 

During the speech focused mostly on other areas, Cruz voiced his opposition to legislation to expand online sales taxes, Obama’s recommendations on net neutrality and the government's plans to move away from its oversight role of the system governing online Web addresses. 

Many of the points were highlighted in a recent op-ed in The Washington Post

Cruz has been increasingly vocal on tech issues recently. On Monday he was one of the first Republicans out of the gate with a comment blasting the president's recommendation on strict net neutrality rules, comparing it to ObamaCare. 

On Friday, he reiterated his distain for the plan to reclassify the Internet as a public utility in order to enforce rules requiring Internet service providers to treat all traffic the same. He said the move is "dramatic and far reaching" and anyone who is interested in freedom online "would come to regret that decision."

He said the move would freeze innovation in its tracks, comparing an increasingly regulated Internet to the U.S. Postal Service or a taxi commission. In those areas, he said, increased government regulation "calcifies everything."