Lawmakers launch tech diversity caucus

Members of both chambers of Congress on Monday launched a bipartisan caucus aimed at getting more women, minorities and veterans into the tech sector.

The eight leaders of the new Diversifying Technology Caucus said that the effort will work with the startup advocacy group Engine to push for greater inclusiveness and diversity in the industry, which has been criticized for being overly male, white and Asian-American.

ADVERTISEMENT
“If our country’s tech industry is going to stay at the cutting-edge, we have to enlist the creativity and ingenuity of all Americans,” Sen. Amy KlobucharAmy Jean KlobucharOvernight Cybersecurity: Bipartisan bill aims to deter election interference | Russian hackers target Senate | House Intel panel subpoenas Bannon | DHS giving 'active defense' cyber tools to private sector Pawlenty opts out of Senate run in Minnesota Nielsen says 'possible' Trump used vulgar language in meeting MORE (D-Minn.), one of the caucus leaders, said in a statement.

The new caucus “will bring together lawmakers from both sides of the aisle, along with researchers and academics, to shape policy that will help increase diversity in the industry and move our economy forward,” she added.

Sens. Shelley Moore CapitoShelley Wellons Moore CapitoGOP may increase IRS’s budget People with addiction issues should be able to control their own health data Trump signs bipartisan bill to combat synthetic opioids MORE (R-W.V.) and Tim ScottTimothy (Tim) Eugene ScottSchumer: 'I totally believe' Durbin over Trump Graham: 'It's pretty embarrassing' when children can't listen to the news Durbin spokesman: GOP senators have ‘credibility problem’ MORE (R-S.C.) are also chairing the caucus, as are Reps. Cathy McMorris RodgersCathy McMorris RodgersDems face hard choice for State of the Union response Overnight Finance: GOP celebrates as final tax vote nears | Senate expected to pass bill tonight | Why the House needs to vote again | Panel rejects Trump pick to head Ex-Im | All major banks pass Fed 'living will' test Trump congratulates House GOP on passing tax bill MORE (R-Wash.), Barbara Comstock (R-Va.), Tulsi GabbardTulsi GabbardEmergency response worker temporarily reassigned after false Hawaii missile alert Hawaii rep: False alarm shows need for Trump to talk with North Korea Hawaii rep on false nuclear alert: 'These kinds of mistakes' can lead to brink of war MORE (D-Hawaii), Robin Kelly (D-Ill.) and Ruben Gallego (D-Ariz.).

Tech companies have been playing defense for months over charges that Silicon Valley and other industry hubs are too homogenous. At Google, for instance, just 2 percent of the workforce is African-American, and 30 percent is female.

"For America to remain a leader in the innovation economy, we need to make sure that everyone can participate in the tech community regardless of race or gender," McMorris Rodgers said.

In coming weeks, the new caucus will aim to combat that trend by studying the issues, intensifying focus on specific obstacles and forming a congressional advisory council of “tech-friendly” staffers from across the Capitol.