OVERNIGHT TECH: Senators to attend cybersecurity demonstration

Sen. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamBernie Sanders to Trump: Firing Mueller 'an impeachable offense' The Memo: Lawyer’s exit signals harder line by Trump Senators introduced revised version of election cyber bill MORE (R-S.C.) told The Hill on Tuesday that he is working with Sens. Sheldon WhitehouseSheldon WhitehouseOvernight Defense: Senate sides with Trump on military role in Yemen | Dem vets push for new war authorization on Iraq anniversary | General says time isn't 'right' for space corps Overnight Energy: EPA plans to restrict use of science data for regs | Pruitt's Italy trip cost more than K | Perry insists he's staying at Energy Senate sides with Trump on providing Saudi military support MORE (D-R.I.) and Jon Kyl (R-Ariz.) to develop a compromise proposal.

Senate Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry Mason ReidHarry Reid tears into Trump, Senate GOP: They’re ‘acolytes for Trump’ GOP pushes to change Senate rules for Trump Trump presses GOP to change Senate rules MORE (D-Nev.) said in a speech on the Senate floor on Tuesday that he will bring the legislation to the floor "at the earliest possible date."

AT&T eyes Verizon's spectrum: AT&T CEO Randall Stephenson said on Tuesday that his company plans to bid for a block of spectrum that Verizon has said it will sell if the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) approves its deal with a group of cable companies.

Speaking at a forum at the Brookings Institution, Stephenson said the Verizon spectrum "pairs perfectly" with AT&T's current holdings, and the spectrum could "be up and running and hot" within 60 days of approval.

Verizon has said it will sell the valuable spectrum as a condition of the FCC approving its $3.6 billion deal with a coalition of cable companies, including Comcast and Time Warner. The deal would allow Verizon to buy a larger chunk of spectrum and let the companies cross-sell services.

But consumer groups worry that the wireless industry is tilting towards a duopoly of Verizon and AT&T, and AT&T is the last company they would want to see pick up Verizon's spectrum.

Senate defends FCC political ad rule: Senate appropriators voted to advance a spending a bill on Tuesday and, unlike their House counterparts, they did not include a provision to block the FCC's political ad rule.

The rule requires television stations to post data online about political ad buys. Republicans on the House Appropriations subcommittee on Financial Services voted to block the rule, saying it would burden broadcasters.

But Sen. Dick DurbinRichard (Dick) Joseph DurbinTop Senate Dems demand report from Trump on UK nerve agent attack 'Dreamers' fix blocked in Senate GOP leaders to Trump: Leave Mueller alone MORE (D-Ill.), the chairman of the Senate Appropriations subcommittee on Financial Services, vowed he would fight to strip that provision in conference committee and said he supports the FCC ruling. The report language accompanying the Senate bill also supports the FCC ruling.

ICANN set to reveal domain names: The nonprofit organization that manages the Web's address system will unveil thousands of applications for new Web domain names on Wednesday.

The Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) began accepting applications for the new Web address endings, known as generic top-level domains, earlier this year. Soon websites will be able to end in almost any word or phrase, such as .bank or .food, in addition to traditional endings like .com and .org.

The deadline to apply for a new domain was last month. ICANN had expected about 500 applications but received more than 1,900.


Cable industry cheers FCC vote to kill 'viewability rule' 

Text donations to campaigns gets approval from FEC 

FTC cracks down on personal-data site Spokeo 

Holder tells Senate he's been questioned on national security leaks