OVERNIGHT TECH: Senate set to debate cyber amendments

The Lede: Now that Sen. Joe Lieberman's (I-Conn.) cybersecurity bill cleared an important procedural vote, observers will be watching to see if the Senate can work out an agreement on amendments that will be brought to the floor.

The motion to proceed to Lieberman's Cybersecurity Act was approved 84-11 on Thursday, setting the stage for debate on amendments beginning next week. Several Republicans voted in favor of the bill moving forward after Senate Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry ReidTop Lobbyists 2017: Grass roots Boehner confronted Reid after criticism from Senate floor GOP in uncharted territory rolling back rules through resolutions MORE (D-Nev.) agreed to an open amendment process.

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A number of senators already have announced plans to put forward a series of amendments. Sen. Kay Bailey Hutchison (R-Texas) said the co-sponsors of the Secure It Act plan to offer the competing cybersecurity bill as an amendment in the nature of a substitute in a speech on the Senate floor. Hutchison said the Senate should take up Secure It over Lieberman's bill because it had a greater chance of passing both chambers.

In the meantime, members will be meeting again Friday to continue their negotiations on reaching an agreement between the Cybersecurity Act and Secure It. Participants include Lieberman and the co-sponsors of his bill, members involved in leading earlier compromise efforts, as well as the backers of the Secure It Act.

Also on Thursday, Sens. Al FrankenAlan (Al) Stuart FrankenOvernight Tech: Senate panel subpoenaed ex-Yahoo chief | Twitter gives all users 280 characters | FBI can't access Texas shooter's phone | EU wants tax answers from Apple Week ahead: DHS nominee heads before Senate | Ex-Yahoo chief to testify on hack | Senators dig into election security Feinstein: Sessions should re-testify on Russia meetings MORE (D-Minn.), Richard Blumenthal (D-Conn.) and Chris CoonsChristopher (Chris) Andrew CoonsMcConnell: 'I don't hear much pressure' to pass bill protecting Mueller from Trump Bipartisan lawmakers can rebuild trust by passing infusion therapy bill Democrats double down on calls for Congress to protect Mueller MORE (D-Del.) said they plan to introduce amendments aimed at beefing up the privacy protections in the bill. Sen. Daniel Akaka (D-Hawaii) also plans to introduce an amendment that would create a chief privacy officer in the Office of Management and Budget, which Blumenthal is expected to support.

The ACLU voiced support for Franken's amendment in a blog post. The amendment would remove measures in Lieberman's bill that would give Internet service providers and other private companies the authority to monitor communications flowing through their information systems for cyber threats and use certain countermeasures to combat them. 

An aide to Sen. Ron WydenRonald (Ron) Lee WydenLobbying World Overnight Regulation: House to vote on repealing joint-employer rule | EPA won't say which areas don't meet Obama smog rule | Lawmakers urge regulators to reject Perry plan New tax plan will hinder care for older Americans MORE (D-Ore.) said he will file his GPS Act as an amendment. The measure would require police to obtain a warrant before requesting location data from a person's cellphone, laptop or GPS device, except in an emergency.

Industry groups will be weighing whether the amendments will affect their ability to share information with the government. IBM and the U.S. Chamber of Commerce have already raised concerns with the information-sharing provisions in Lieberman's bill.

Sen. Patrick LeahyPatrick Joseph LeahyMaxine Waters to Sessions: 'Time to go back to the plantation' Franken has 'a lot of questions' for Sessions on Russia contacts Senate Dems demand Sessions testify after Papadopoulos plea deal MORE (D-Vt.) has filed four amendments that focus on data security and privacy, and stiffening penalties for cyber crime, among other issues. Sen. Ron Wyden (D-Ore.) has also said he plans on putting forward privacy-focused amendments. 

Sen. Frank Lautenberg (D-N.J.) filed an amendment that would ban high-capacity gun magazines in the wake of the massacre in Aurora, Colo. The amendment is also backed by Democratic Sens. Barbara BoxerBarbara BoxerFour more lawmakers say they’ve been sexually harassed by colleagues in Congress California Hispanics are the vanguard for a new political paradigm Trump riles Dems with pick for powerful EPA job MORE (Calif.), Jack ReedJohn (Jack) Raymond ReedAfter Texas shooting, lawmakers question whether military has systemic reporting problem McCain pledges 'rigorous oversight' after Air Force failure to report Texas gunman's conviction Dems furious over Air Force failure to report Texas shooter's conviction MORE (R.I.), Robert MenendezRobert (Bob) MenendezIn judge's 2010 Senate trial, Menendez was guilty of hypocrisy Excused Menendez juror: 'I don't think he did anything wrong' We don't need a terrorist attack to know diversity program has to go MORE (N.J.), Kirsten GillibrandKirsten Elizabeth GillibrandAfter Texas shooting, lawmakers question whether military has systemic reporting problem Senators push mandatory sexual harassment training for members, staff CNN to air sexual harassment Town Hall featuring Gretchen Carlson, Anita Hill MORE (N.Y.), Charles SchumerCharles (Chuck) Ellis SchumerTrump is right: The visa lotto has got to go Schumer predicts bipartisan support for passing DACA fix this year No room for amnesty in our government spending bill MORE (N.Y.) and Dianne FeinsteinDianne Emiel FeinsteinSenators push mandatory sexual harassment training for members, staff Bipartisan group of lawmakers aim to reform US sugar program Senate panel to hold hearing on bump stocks MORE (N.Y.).

Facebook meets expectations, but stock slips: Facebook met analysts' expectations in its first earning report as a public company on Thursday, but the stock's value fell about 10 percent in after-hours trading.

The company reported a second-quarter loss of $157 million, but that was mostly due to stock-based compensations. Not counting those costs, the company reported $295 million in earnings and $1.18 billion in revenue. 

FCC unveils Connect America map: The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) unveiled an online map on Thursday that shows where its Connect America funds are going.

The Connect America Fund is a multibillion-dollar subsidy to support expanding broadband Internet access. The FCC created the subsidy last year when it overhauled its Universal Service Fund, which supported telephone service.

The FCC announced on Wednesday that it will spend $115 million in the first phase of Connect America.


In Case You Missed It:

Google unveils ultrafast Internet service for Kansas City 

Microsoft, Oracle back Lieberman cyber bill 

GOP senators indicate they will move forward with cybersecurity bill 

Lieberman pushes back against Chamber's opposition to cybersecurity bill 

White House endorses revised cybersecurity bill 

IBM comes out swinging against revised cybersecurity bill 


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