OVERNIGHT TECH: Senate negotiating which cybersecurity amendments get votes

In the meantime, backers of Lieberman's bill and Senate Republicans are still trying to make progress on identifying amendments that both sides can agree on. This afternoon a group of senators met with Gen. Keith Alexander, who wears the dual hat as head of U.S. Cyber Command and director of the National Security Agency, in the Capitol to discuss cybersecurity. Participants in the meeting included the co-sponsors of the Cybersecurity Act and SECURE IT backers Sens. Kay Bailey Hutchison (R-Texas), Ron Johnson (R-Wis.) and Saxby Chambliss (R-Ga.), according to a Senate aide.  Other participants included members who have been involved in earlier compromise efforts, including Sens. Roy Blunt (R-Mo.), Chris Coons (D-Del.), Sheldon Whitehouse (D-R.I.) and Jon Kyl (R-Ariz.).

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But according to Secure IT co-sponsor Sen. Chuck Grassley (R-Iowa), "there isn't any agreement yet" on cybersecurity legislation. 

"I'll bet you you won't have an agreement announced until 2:15 tomorrow," he said.

The possible amendments include a series from Sen. Patrick Leahy (D-Vt.) to establish on data security and data privacy. Sen. Pat Toomey (R-Pa.) has filed his own narrower data breach bill as an amendment.

Software group applauds cyber bill: The Business Software Alliance applauded Lieberman's revised cybersecurity bill on Monday.

“We believe S.3414 creates a solid framework and foundation for the cybersecurity debate over the coming days,” BSA President and CEO Robert Holleyman said in a statement. “We hope there will be a robust and open debate on the floor and look forward to working with Senators on both sides of the aisle to ensure a well-crafted bill is passed.”

In a letter to the bill's sponsors, Holleyman praised the information-sharing provisions and said the changes to the critical infrastructure standards are "progress in the right direction," but should be amended to ensure that they are truly voluntary.

Data privacy hearing: On Tuesday morning, the Senate Homeland Security and Government Affairs Committee's subcommittee on Oversight of Government Management will hold a hearing to consider whether to update the 1974 Privacy Act, which restricts how the federal government can handle people's personal information.

Subcommittee Chairman Daniel Akaka (D-Hawaii) has sponsored a bill, S. 1732, that would implement privacy safeguards and require federal agencies to notify the public in the event of a data breach.

The witnesses will be Mary Ellen Callahan, the Homeland Security Department's chief privacy officer; Greg Long, executive director of the Federal Retirement Thrift Investment Board; Greg Wilshusen, director of information security issues for the Government Accountability Office; Peter Swire, law professor at Ohio State University; Chris Calabrese, legislative counsel for the American Civil Liberties Union; and Paul Rosenzweig, a visiting fellow for The Heritage Foundation.


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