President signs foreign surveillance reauthorization bill into law

Critics of the bill said the surveillance program lacked sufficient oversight and privacy protections for people's email and phone communications.

In a floor speech last week, Sen. Ron WydenRonald (Ron) Lee WydenLobbying world Hillicon Valley: Trump claims 'no deal' to help Chinese company ZTE | Congress briefed on election cyber threats | Mueller mystery - Where's indictment for DNC hack? | Zuckerberg faces tough questions in Europe Senator presses DOD to secure agency’s publicly accessible web pages MORE (D-Ore.) said intelligence officials have failed to provide estimates on how often U.S. citizens' email or phone communications have been swept up under the foreign surveillance program. He offered an amendment that would require intelligence agencies to report that information.

Sens. Jeff MerkleyJeffrey (Jeff) Alan MerkleyWashington governor to make Iowa debut Hillicon Valley: Facebook, Google struggle to block terrorist content | Cambridge Analytica declares bankruptcy in US | Company exposed phone location data | Apple starts paying back taxes to Ireland Overnight Energy: Pruitt taps man behind 'lock her up' chant for EPA office | Watchdog to review EPA email policies | Three Republicans join climate caucus MORE (D-Ore.), Patrick LeahyPatrick Joseph LeahyDem senator mocks Pruitt over alleged security threats: 'Nobody even knows who you are' Pruitt tells senators: ‘I share your concerns about some of these decisions’ Protesters hold up 'fire him' signs behind Pruitt during hearing MORE (D-Vt.) and Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulGOP Senate primary heats up in Montana Sarah Sanders: ‘Democrats are losing their war against women in the Trump administration’ Kentucky Dems look to vault themselves in deep-red district MORE (R-Ky.) also offered amendments to the bill that were aimed at beefing up the privacy protections in it. All four amendments were rejected last week.

The bill passed the Senate 73-23.