Handful of Dems break ranks on net neutrality vote

Five House Democrats broke ranks and voted with Republicans on Friday to approve a bill to prevent the Federal Communications Commission from regulating the rates that Internet providers charge for service. 

Any crossovers were striking because the vote was seen as the closest thing to a referendum on the FCC's net neutrality regulations since they were approved on a divided vote at the commission last year.

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The Democratic yes votes came from Reps. Jim CostaJames (Jim) Manuel CostaDem, GOP groups prepare spending blitz for midterms Religious tensions flare after chaplain's ouster House passes 5-year reauthorization of Federal Aviation Administration MORE (Calif.), Scott PetersScott H. PetersDem lawmakers seek distance from Waters call for confrontation More information leads to better quality care for patients. Congress can help Overnight Energy: Two top Pruitt aides resign at EPA | 17 states sue EPA over car emissions rules | Volkswagen to pay West Virginia .5M over emissions cheating MORE (Calif.), Collin PetersonCollin Clark PetersonHouse and Senate farm bills set contrasting visions for SNAP program Commodity checkoff reform needed Democrats should stop agonizing over a national message for 2018 MORE (Minn.), Kyrsten Sinema (Ariz.) and Albio SiresAlbio B. SiresRepublicans top Dems at charity golf game Dem lawmakers make surprise visit to ICE detention center Chao confirms Trump pushing Ryan to withhold Gateway project funding MORE (N.J.).  

All but Sires are Democrats aligning with the Blue Dogs, the New Dem Coalition or both. Both groups are seen as more centrist than the Democratic Party in general. 

Three of the five — Peters, Peterson and Sinema — are in competitive races in 2016, but observers expect them to hold their seats. 

The bill would prevent the FCC from setting or reviewing the prices that Internet service providers charge. The FCC has said it has no intention of regulating those rates under its net neutrality rules. Democrats say the GOP bill would go much further to limit much of the commission's authority. 

The White House vowed to veto the bill if it ever made it to the president's desk.