Obama makes call for high-skilled immigration reform in inaugural address

The issue is a cornerstone policy priority for tech giants such as Microsoft and Intel, which argue that they struggle to fill positions for engineering and research jobs because most applicants don't have the requisite skills for these positions. Tech companies also argue that they want to keep this talent in the U.S. rather than lose it to competitors abroad.

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Obama has advocated for high-skilled immigration reform before. During the presidential debates last year, Obama noted that immigrants in the U.S. have founded some of the most prominent American tech companies, such as Google and Intel.

High-skilled immigration legislation has typically enjoyed bipartisan support, but past efforts to pass such measures have been tangled up in the larger immigration debate. The momentum for passing a comprehensive immigration package has ramped up after Obama received roughly 70 percent of the Hispanic vote during the 2012 election.

Sen. Marco RubioMarco RubioSenate rivals gear up for debates Rubio: End of Obama's term could be 'most damaging yet' Fifteen years since pivotal executive order, STORM Act could help fight terror finance MORE (R-Fla.) is working with Sen. Orrin HatchOrrin HatchInternet companies dominate tech lobbying Senate panel approves pension rescue for coal miners Overnight Tech: GOP says internet fight isn't over | EU chief defends Apple tax ruling | Feds roll out self-driving car guidelines | Netflix's China worries MORE (R-Utah) to put forward immigration legislation, which is expected to include a high-skilled immigration measure. In an interview with The Wall Street Journal this month, Rubio said bringing more high-skilled labor into the U.S. would be beneficial to the economy.

Sens. Chris CoonsChris CoonsOvernight Healthcare: McConnell unveils new Zika package | Manchin defends daughter on EpiPens | Bill includes M for opioid crisis Dems to GOP: Help us fix ObamaCare Cruz fights domain name handover in hearing MORE (D-Del.) and Amy KlobucharAmy KlobucharOvernight Defense: US attempted hostage rescue in Afghanistan | Defense hawks brace for spending fight | Trump slams 'lies' about Iraq war stance Senators want military separation policy to address trauma-related behavior Senate Dems reignite fight for hearing on SCOTUS nominee MORE (D-Minn.) are said to be working with Rubio on the high-skilled measure.

During his address, Obama also called for the U.S. to work together to improve math and science education programs in the country, which he said would prepare students for the jobs of the future.

"No single person can train all the math and science teachers we’ll need to equip our children for the future, or build the roads and networks and research labs that will bring new jobs and businesses to our shores," Obama said. "Now, more than ever, we must do these things together, as one nation, and one people." 

He also noted that technology would be key to updating a variety of "outworn" programs, both inside and outside government.

"We understand that outworn programs are inadequate to the needs of our time.  We must harness new ideas and technology to remake our government, revamp our tax code, reform our schools, and empower our citizens with the skills they need to work harder, learn more, and reach higher," Obama said.

Additionally, the president said the U.S. needs to continue fostering technology and innovation, particuarly green tech, so it can stay competitive globally.

"The path toward sustainable energy sources will be long and sometimes difficult. But America cannot resist this transition; we must lead it. We cannot cede to other nations the technology that will power new jobs and new industries — we must claim its promise," Obama said. "That is how we will maintain our economic vitality and our national treasure — our forests and waterways; our croplands and snowcapped peaks."

This post was updated at 2:29 p.m.