Democrats: Cybersecurity legislation a priority in new Congress

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The resolution is co-sponsored by Democratic Sens. Carl LevinCarl LevinAs other regulators move past implementing Dodd-Frank, the SEC falls further behind Will partisan politics infect the Supreme Court? Fight for taxpayers draws fire MORE (Mich.), Barbara MikulskiBarbara MikulskiEmphasis on diversity in Democratic convention lineup Senate confirms first black female librarian of Congress Clinton pens tribute to feminist website The Toast MORE (Md.), Sheldon WhitehouseSheldon WhitehouseWhy Kaine is the right choice for Clinton Report: More, stronger cyber attacks to flood networks Senate Dems push Obama for more Iran transparency MORE (D-R.I.) and Chris CoonsChris CoonsSenators ask IRS to issue guidance to help startups Senate Dems push Obama for more Iran transparency Overnight Tech: First on The Hill – Key senators team up against robocalls | Social media giants back revenge porn bill | Facebook's diversity numbers MORE (Del.).


“The new Congress has a real opportunity to reach needed consensus on bipartisan legislation that will strengthen our nation’s cybersecurity,” Rockefeller said in a statement.

Feinstein warned that the "threat of a cyber attack is real, and it is growing."

"Given all that relies on a safe and secure Internet, it is vital that we do what’s necessary to protect ourselves from hackers, cyber thieves, and terrorists," Carper said.

Democrats and the Obama administration last year backed the Cybersecurity Act, which would have set cybersecurity standards for critical infrastructure operators and would have encouraged companies and the government to share information about cyber threats.

Republicans, led by Sen. John McCainJohn McCainSyria activists cheer Kaine pick Clinton brings in the heavy hitters Guess which Cuban-American 2016 candidate best set themselves up for 2020? MORE (R-Ariz.), claimed the bill's cybersecurity standards would have been cumbersome and ineffective. Supporters were unable to muster the 60 votes needed to overcome a GOP filibuster. 

The White House is now working on an executive order that would encourage companies to meet government cybersecurity standards.