Democrats: Cybersecurity legislation a priority in new Congress

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The resolution is co-sponsored by Democratic Sens. Carl LevinCarl LevinA lesson on abuse of power by Obama and his Senate allies President Trump, listen to candidate Trump and keep Volcker Rule Republicans can learn from John McCain’s heroism MORE (Mich.), Barbara MikulskiBarbara MikulskiClinton: White House slow-walking Russia sanctions Top Lobbyists 2017: Hired Guns Gore wishes Mikulski a happy birthday at 'Inconvenient Sequel' premiere MORE (Md.), Sheldon WhitehouseSheldon WhitehouseTech companies grilled over Russian election interference Hitting GOP, Dems pitch raising 401(k) caps Democrats double down on calls for Congress to protect Mueller MORE (D-R.I.) and Chris CoonsChristopher (Chris) Andrew CoonsMcConnell: 'I don't hear much pressure' to pass bill protecting Mueller from Trump Bipartisan lawmakers can rebuild trust by passing infusion therapy bill Democrats double down on calls for Congress to protect Mueller MORE (Del.).


“The new Congress has a real opportunity to reach needed consensus on bipartisan legislation that will strengthen our nation’s cybersecurity,” Rockefeller said in a statement.

Feinstein warned that the "threat of a cyber attack is real, and it is growing."

"Given all that relies on a safe and secure Internet, it is vital that we do what’s necessary to protect ourselves from hackers, cyber thieves, and terrorists," Carper said.

Democrats and the Obama administration last year backed the Cybersecurity Act, which would have set cybersecurity standards for critical infrastructure operators and would have encouraged companies and the government to share information about cyber threats.

Republicans, led by Sen. John McCainJohn Sidney McCainGOP rushes to cut ties to Moore GOP strategist: 'There needs to be a repudiation' of Roy Moore by Republicans World leaders reach agreement on trade deal without United States: report MORE (R-Ariz.), claimed the bill's cybersecurity standards would have been cumbersome and ineffective. Supporters were unable to muster the 60 votes needed to overcome a GOP filibuster. 

The White House is now working on an executive order that would encourage companies to meet government cybersecurity standards.