This Week in Tech: House to examine email privacy rules

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Revising the law to protect all electronic communications, regardless of how old they are, is a top goal for Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Patrick LeahyPatrick Joseph LeahyMaxine Waters to Sessions: 'Time to go back to the plantation' Franken has 'a lot of questions' for Sessions on Russia contacts Senate Dems demand Sessions testify after Papadopoulos plea deal MORE (D-Vt.).

House Judiciary Committee Chairman Bob GoodlatteRobert (Bob) William GoodlatteJuan Williams: The shame of Trump's enablers GOP bill would ban abortions when heartbeat is detected Overnight Regulation: GOP flexes power over consumer agency | Trump lets states expand drone use | Senate panel advances controversial EPA pick | House passes bill to curb 'sue-and-settle' regs MORE (R-Va.) said earlier this month that modernizing the privacy act to “reflect our current digital economy” will be a priority for his committee. Reps. Zoe Lofgren (D-Calif.), Ted PoeTed PoeFive takeaways from the Virginia governor’s race Texas GOP lawmaker won’t seek reelection House passes bill to revoke passports of terror suspects MORE (R-Texas) and Suzan DelBeneSuzan Kay DelBeneCybersecurity is key for the smart cities of tomorrow Overnight Health Care: ObamaCare signup groups to get answers on funding this week | Dems demand Trump action on opioids | More Dems back ‘Medicare for All’ bill Week ahead: Senate panel looks to quickly strike deal on ObamaCare fix MORE (D-Wash.) have introduced legislation that would require police to obtain a warrant before accessing private online communications or mobile location data.

Tuesday’s hearing, which will be held by the subcommittee on Crime, Terrorism, Homeland Security and Investigations, will be a chance to discover other lawmakers’ opinions on the issue and whether law enforcement groups plan to push back aggressively on the proposal.

In other technology news, the House Judiciary’s subcommittee on Courts, Intellectual Property and the Internet will hold a hearing on Wednesday afternoon to consider revising copyright law. Lawmakers will likely bring up the issue of cellphone unlocking, which allows owners to switch their device to a new carrier, as well as a broader look at the Digital Millennium Copyright Act, according to a committee aide.

It’s also another packed week of cybersecurity-related hearings, with three different congressional committees examining the issue.

On Tuesday, Mandiant CEO Kevin Mandia will brief the Senate Armed Service Committee’s subpanel on Emerging Threats and Capabilities about cyber threats the computer security firm is observing. The subcommittee will then hold a closed briefing with Stephanie O’Sullivan, principal deputy director of national intelligence, and Lt. General Jon Davis, deputy commander of U.S. Cyber Command.

The House Homeland Security Committee’s Cybersecurity subpanel will hold a Wednesday hearing that will cover the cyber threats stemming from Iran, China and Russia. The witnesses slated to testify are Frank Cilluffo, director of the Homeland Security Policy Institute at George Washington University; Richard Bejtlich, chief security officer at Mandiant; Ilan Berman, vice president of the American Foreign Policy Council; and Martin Libicki, senior management strategist at the RAND Corporation.

On Thursday, the House Foreign Affairs Committee’s subpanel on Emerging Threats will hear from Mandiant Chief Security Officer Richard Bejtlich and Coalition for a Prosperous America senior economist Greg Autry at a hearing that will examine the national security threat that cyberattacks pose.

The Senate Judiciary Committee will hold a hearing on Wednesday morning to examine the privacy issues surrounding domestic drone use.

The House Energy and Commerce Committee will hold three days of hearings to examine regulation and taxation of health information technology, including smartphones and tablets.

The Association of National Advertisers will hold a two-day conference on advertising law and public policy. Sen. Mark PryorMark PryorMedicaid rollback looms for GOP senators in 2020 Cotton pitches anti-Democrat message to SC delegation Ex-Sen. Kay Hagan joins lobby firm MORE (D-Ark.) will give the opening remarks on Tuesday morning, Federal Trade Commission Commissioner Julie Brill will speak on Wednesday morning and Fadi Chehadé, the president and CEO of ICANN, will speak on Wednesday afternoon.

Sen. Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioOvernight Cybersecurity: What we learned from Carter Page's House Intel testimony | House to mark up foreign intel reform law | FBI can't access Texas shooter's phone | Sessions to testify at hearing amid Russia scrutiny Cornyn: Senate GOP tax plan to be released Thursday This week: GOP seeks to advance tax overhaul MORE (R-Fla.) and Ajit Pai, a Republican member of the Federal Communications Commission will speak at the Free State Foundation’s Telecom Policy Conference on Thursday.


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