Senate Dems offer bill to restore internet privacy rules

Senate Dems offer bill to restore internet privacy rules
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Senate Democrats introduced legislation on Thursday that would reinstate internet privacy rules repealed earlier this week.

The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) rule, passed in October, required internet service providers to get permission from customers before selling data about them to advertisers.

A bill to repeal the rules narrowly passed Congress last month, and President Trump signed it into law on Monday. That measure also prohibits the FCC from reinstating the regulations or anything substantially similar.

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The new legislation, introduced by Sen. Ed MarkeyEdward (Ed) John MarkeyHillicon Valley: Lawmakers target Chinese tech giants | Dems move to save top cyber post | Trump gets a new CIA chief | Ryan delays election security briefing | Twitter CEO meets lawmakers Twitter CEO meets with lawmakers to talk net neutrality, privacy Senate votes to save net neutrality rules MORE (D-Mass.), would undo the repeal and reinstate the regulations, which were set to go into effect later this year.

“Thanks to Congressional Republicans, corporations, not consumers, are in control of sensitive information about Americans’ health, finances, and children,” Markey said in a statement. 

“The Republican roll-back of strong broadband privacy rules means ISP no longer stands for Internet Service Provider, it stands for ‘Information Sold for Profit.’” 

The bill is being co-sponsored by Sens. Richard Blumenthal (D-Conn.), Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenRising star Abrams advances in Georgia governor race Progressive rise is good news for Sanders, Warren Juan Williams: Trump gives life to the left MORE (D-Mass.), Bernie SandersBernard (Bernie) SandersTrump claims a 'spy' on his campaign tried to help 'Crooked Hillary' win Rising star Abrams advances in Georgia governor race Webb: Drain the swamp MORE (I-Vt.), Jeff MerkleyJeffrey (Jeff) Alan MerkleyWashington governor to make Iowa debut Hillicon Valley: Facebook, Google struggle to block terrorist content | Cambridge Analytica declares bankruptcy in US | Company exposed phone location data | Apple starts paying back taxes to Ireland Overnight Energy: Pruitt taps man behind 'lock her up' chant for EPA office | Watchdog to review EPA email policies | Three Republicans join climate caucus MORE (D-Ore.), Martin HeinrichMartin Trevor HeinrichHillicon Valley: AT&T calls hiring Cohen a 'big mistake' | Wyden wants to block DHS nominee over Stingray surveillance | Amazon pressed on child privacy | One year anniversary of Trump cyber order Moment of truth for Trump pick to lead CIA Puerto Rico's electric grid under scrutiny as new hurricane season looms MORE (D-N.M.), Tom UdallThomas (Tom) Stewart UdallDem senator presses EPA over reporter 'intimidation' Dems expand 2018 message to ‘draining the swamp’ Overnight Energy: Pruitt taps man behind 'lock her up' chant for EPA office | Watchdog to review EPA email policies | Three Republicans join climate caucus MORE (D-N.M.), Patrick LeahyPatrick Joseph LeahyDem senator mocks Pruitt over alleged security threats: 'Nobody even knows who you are' Pruitt tells senators: ‘I share your concerns about some of these decisions’ Protesters hold up 'fire him' signs behind Pruitt during hearing MORE (D-Vt.), Tammy BaldwinTammy Suzanne BaldwinMcConnell: Midterms will be 'very challenging' for GOP Vukmir gets boost with Wisconsin Senate GOP primary endorsement  GOP senate candidate dismisses 'fake outrage' over remarks against Democratic veterans MORE (D-Wis.), Chris Van Hollen (D-Md.) and Al FrankenAlan (Al) Stuart FrankenEx-White House ethics counsel: More evidence against Trump than there ever was against Nixon 100 days after House passage, Gillibrand calls on Senate to act on sexual harassment reform Eric Schneiderman and #MeToo pose challenges for both parties MORE (D-Minn.).

It is extremely unlikely Markey's bill will get off the ground, and Republicans have stood by the move in the face of criticism.

Defenders of the repeal say that the regulations unfairly subjected internet service providers to privacy restrictions not required of websites like Facebook and Google, which account for much of the internet’s advertising market.