Dropbox hires new lobbying firm to help out on immigration, surveillance

Dropbox hires new lobbying firm to help out on immigration, surveillance

Dropbox is picking up a new lobbying firm to help it push its agenda on Capitol Hill.

The cloud computing company will be employing Crossroads Strategies, a 7-year-old D.C. lobbying firm headed by John Green, a former longtime Senate aide and founder of the Federalist Group, another government relations firm.

Crossroads is the third lobbying group that Dropbox has brought on this year. The San Francisco-based company had previously hired the Glover Park Group and Franklin Square Group to lobby on its behalf.

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Lobbyists at the firm expected to advocate on behalf of Dropbox in D.C. include a team of staffers from both sides of the aisle in Congress, including the offices of former Sen. Harry ReidHarry ReidChris Murphy’s profile rises with gun tragedies Republicans are headed for a disappointing end to their year in power Obama's HHS secretary could testify in Menendez trial MORE (D-Nev.), Sen. Patty MurrayPatricia (Patty) Lynn MurrayChildren’s health-care bill faces new obstacles Overnight Health Care: Schumer calls for tying ObamaCare fix to children's health insurance | Puerto Rico's water woes worsen | Dems plead for nursing home residents' right to sue Schumer calls for attaching ObamaCare fix to children's health insurance MORE (D-Wash.) and Rep. Dave ReichertDavid ReichertJuan Williams: Momentum builds against gerrymandering GOP worries as state Dems outperform in special elections Targeted Republicans push back on retirement speculation MORE (R-Wash.).

Dropbox has been ramping up its lobbying spending in D.C. The company spent $725,000 in 2016, over double what it spent in 2013, 2014 and 2015 combined. Dropbox has already spent $190,000 on lobbying in 2017, more it spent in total over each of those three years.

According to a lobbying disclosure filing, the Crossroads team will help Dropbox try to influence policy on government surveillance reforms, the Electronics Communications Privacy Act (ECPA), patents, immigration and Privacy Shield, a U.S. data collection and sharing agreement with Europe.

Each are high priorities for the corporate technology community. ECPA reform requiring law enforcement to obtain a warrant to obtain digital correspondence of citizens is in the legislative pipeline, with the House passing the measure earlier in the year.

The bill, however, is expected to face opposition from some Republicans in the Senate, including Sen. John CornynJohn CornynGun proposal picks up GOP support House bill set to reignite debate on warrantless surveillance Republicans jockey for position on immigration MORE (R-Texas), who would like to see more surveillance-friendly provisions in the bill.