Dropbox hires new lobbying firm to help out on immigration, surveillance

Dropbox hires new lobbying firm to help out on immigration, surveillance

Dropbox is picking up a new lobbying firm to help it push its agenda on Capitol Hill.

The cloud computing company will be employing Crossroads Strategies, a 7-year-old D.C. lobbying firm headed by John Green, a former longtime Senate aide and founder of the Federalist Group, another government relations firm.

Crossroads is the third lobbying group that Dropbox has brought on this year. The San Francisco-based company had previously hired the Glover Park Group and Franklin Square Group to lobby on its behalf.

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Lobbyists at the firm expected to advocate on behalf of Dropbox in D.C. include a team of staffers from both sides of the aisle in Congress, including the offices of former Sen. Harry ReidHarry ReidDems see surge of new candidates Dems to grind Senate to a halt over ObamaCare repeal fight GOP fires opening attack on Dem reportedly running for Heller's Senate seat MORE (D-Nev.), Sen. Patty MurrayPatty MurrayLive coverage: Senate GOP unveils its ObamaCare repeal bill Senators grill Perry on Yucca nuclear storage plans Budget process drags as GOP struggles for consensus MORE (D-Wash.) and Rep. Dave ReichertDavid ReichertTime to fix our national parks House GOP not sold on Ryan’s tax reform plan Lawmakers push back against Trump offshore drilling review MORE (R-Wash.).

Dropbox has been ramping up its lobbying spending in D.C. The company spent $725,000 in 2016, over double what it spent in 2013, 2014 and 2015 combined. Dropbox has already spent $190,000 on lobbying in 2017, more it spent in total over each of those three years.

According to a lobbying disclosure filing, the Crossroads team will help Dropbox try to influence policy on government surveillance reforms, the Electronics Communications Privacy Act (ECPA), patents, immigration and Privacy Shield, a U.S. data collection and sharing agreement with Europe.

Each are high priorities for the corporate technology community. ECPA reform requiring law enforcement to obtain a warrant to obtain digital correspondence of citizens is in the legislative pipeline, with the House passing the measure earlier in the year.

The bill, however, is expected to face opposition from some Republicans in the Senate, including Sen. John CornynJohn CornynLawmakers want meeting with Trump administration to take US-Mexico border trade Rocky rollout for Senate healthcare bill The Hill's Whip List: Senate ObamaCare repeal bill MORE (R-Texas), who would like to see more surveillance-friendly provisions in the bill.