Zuckerberg: Maybe tech should face some regulations

Zuckerberg: Maybe tech should face some regulations
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Facebook chief executive Mark ZuckerbergMark Elliot ZuckerbergHillicon Valley: Trump claims 'no deal' to help Chinese company ZTE | Congress briefed on election cyber threats | Mueller mystery - Where's indictment for DNC hack? | Zuckerberg faces tough questions in Europe Zuckerberg faces tough crowd during European Parliament hearing Nigel Farage to Zuckerberg: Brexit, Trump wouldn't have happened without Facebook MORE said on Wednesday that he’s open to having his company be regulated.

“Actually, I’m not sure we shouldn’t be regulated,” Zuckerberg said in an interview with CNN that represented some of his first public remarks since the Cambridge Analytica controversy plunged his company into crisis and led to calls for his testimony before Congress.

“I actually think the question is more ‘What is the right regulation?’ rather than ‘Yes or no, should it be regulated?’” Zuckerberg told CNN. 

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The Facebook CEO said that “he would love to see” new transparency regulations for political advertisements. Facebook has been criticized for a lack of transparency.

“If you look at how much regulation there is around advertising on TV, in print, you know, it's just not clear why there should be less on the internet,” he said.

Facebook and other tech firms have resisted legislative efforts in Congress to impose new regulations.

Late year, Sens. Amy KlobucharAmy Jean KlobucharSenators introduce bill to overhaul sexual harassment policy Senate reaches deal on new sexual harassment policy Washington governor to make Iowa debut MORE (D-Minn.) and Mark WarnerMark Robert WarnerConservatives leery of FBI deal on informant Overnight Finance: House sends Dodd-Frank rollbacks to Trump | What's in the bill | Trump says there is 'no deal' to help ZTE | Panel approves bill to toughen foreign investment reviews DHS secretary says she hasn’t seen assessment that Russia interfered to help Trump win MORE (D-Va.) introduced the Honest Ads Act, legislation that would hold internet platforms like Facebook to the same political ad disclosure standards as TV, radio and print political advertisements.

The bill has yet to gain traction in Congress. Even though Sen. John McCainJohn Sidney McCainFor .2 billion, taxpayers should get more than Congress’s trial balloons Overnight Defense: Pompeo lays out new Iran terms | Pentagon hints at more aggressive posture against Iran | House, Senate move on defense bill Senate GOP urges Trump administration to work closely with Congress on NAFTA MORE (R-Ariz.) has backed the bill, few Republicans have been willing to follow suit and publicly jump on board.

Facebook has faced intense scrutiny from critics, including lawmakers on Capitol Hill, since it revealed that the British research firm Cambridge Analytica improperly took data from 50 million Facebook users without those users' consent.

The company had previously been scrutinized for how Russian groups used its platform to attempt to influence the 2016 presidential election.