Zuckerberg: Maybe tech should face some regulations

Zuckerberg: Maybe tech should face some regulations
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Facebook chief executive Mark ZuckerbergMark Elliot ZuckerbergViolence in Myanmar poses major test for Facebook US, EU must work together in wake of Facebook data breach Hillicon Valley: Lawmakers press Apple, Google on data collection | 21M affected by Timehop breach | Zuckerberg passes Buffett on rich list | Latest on Twitter's bot crackdown MORE said on Wednesday that he’s open to having his company be regulated.

“Actually, I’m not sure we shouldn’t be regulated,” Zuckerberg said in an interview with CNN that represented some of his first public remarks since the Cambridge Analytica controversy plunged his company into crisis and led to calls for his testimony before Congress.

“I actually think the question is more ‘What is the right regulation?’ rather than ‘Yes or no, should it be regulated?’” Zuckerberg told CNN. 

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The Facebook CEO said that “he would love to see” new transparency regulations for political advertisements. Facebook has been criticized for a lack of transparency.

“If you look at how much regulation there is around advertising on TV, in print, you know, it's just not clear why there should be less on the internet,” he said.

Facebook and other tech firms have resisted legislative efforts in Congress to impose new regulations.

Late year, Sens. Amy KlobucharAmy Jean KlobucharBooker seizes on Kavanaugh confirmation fight Democrats build abortion case against Kavanaugh  The animating forces behind the Democratic Party are true, radical leftists MORE (D-Minn.) and Mark WarnerMark Robert WarnerSenate Dems rip Trump after Putin news conference Trump and Putin should be talking about cyber weapons and social media instead of nuclear weapons The Hill's Morning Report — Trump, Putin meet under cloud of Mueller’s Russia indictments MORE (D-Va.) introduced the Honest Ads Act, legislation that would hold internet platforms like Facebook to the same political ad disclosure standards as TV, radio and print political advertisements.

The bill has yet to gain traction in Congress. Even though Sen. John McCainJohn Sidney McCainGOP lambasts Trump over performance in Helsinki Trump stuns the world at Putin summit NY Daily News cover following Helsinki summit shows Trump shooting Uncle Sam MORE (R-Ariz.) has backed the bill, few Republicans have been willing to follow suit and publicly jump on board.

Facebook has faced intense scrutiny from critics, including lawmakers on Capitol Hill, since it revealed that the British research firm Cambridge Analytica improperly took data from 50 million Facebook users without those users' consent.

The company had previously been scrutinized for how Russian groups used its platform to attempt to influence the 2016 presidential election.