Senate confirms full slate of FTC commissioners

Senate confirms full slate of FTC commissioners
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The Senate on Thursday unanimously confirmed all five of President TrumpDonald John TrumpWhite House counsel called Trump 'King Kong' behind his back: report Trump stays out of Arizona's ugly and costly GOP fight Trump claims he instructed White House counsel to cooperate with Mueller MORE's nominees to serve on the Federal Trade Commission (FTC), bringing the consumer protection agency to full strength for the first time since the start of the new administration.

The FTC will now be chaired by Joseph Simons, a Republican antitrust attorney who led the commission's competition bureau during the George W. Bush administration.

Also confirmed Thursday were two other Republicans — Noah Phillips, an aide to Sen. John CornynJohn CornynSen. Warner to introduce amendment limiting Trump’s ability to revoke security clearances Sentencing reform deal heats up, pitting Trump against reliable allies Rand Paul to ask Trump to lift sanctions on Russian leaders MORE (Texas), and Delta Air Lines executive Christine Wilson — plus two Democrats — Rohit Chopra, a consumer advocate and former Consumer Financial Protection Bureau official, and Rebecca Slaughter, an adviser to Senate Minority Leader Charles SchumerCharles (Chuck) Ellis SchumerTo make the House of Representatives work again, make it bigger Reforms can stop members of Congress from using their public office for private gain Election Countdown: GOP worries House majority endangered by top of ticket | Dems make history in Tuesday's primaries | Parties fight for Puerto Rican vote in Florida | GOP lawmakers plan 'Freedom Tour' MORE (D-N.Y.).

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The agency has been operating with just two commissioners for the past 15 months, and the one Democrat at the agency, Terrell McSweeny, was set to step down after Friday.

The new leadership will have to hit the ground running on several pressing issues.

The FTC is currently investigating Facebook's handling of the Cambridge Analytica scandal to determine whether the company violated a 2011 consent decree, a probe that could lead to hefty fines.

The agency will also soon be tasked with policing internet service providers as the Federal Communications Commission relinquishes its oversight of the industry with the repeal of that commission's net neutrality rules.