Boeing takes NLRB lawyer to task

At issue is a Boeing plan to build 787s at a plant in Charleston, S.C., instead of its home of Seattle, Wash. The NLRB sued to stop it, saying the decision was retribution for union members' strikes in Washington state.

On April 23, Solomon told The New York Times that Boeing "had a consistent message that they were doing this to punish their employees for having struck and having the power to strike in the future."

Luttig took issue not just with Solomon asserting the move to South Carolina was retaliatory, but that it was a "transfer" of work.

"As you well know, no work — none at all — was 'removed' or 'transferred' from Puget Sound," Luttig wrote to Solomon. "The second line for the 787 is a new final assembly line. As it did not previously exist in Puget Sound or elsewhere, the second assembly could not have been 'removed' from, 'transferred' or otherwise 'moved' to South Carolina."

Likely Republican presidential candidate Tim Pawlenty has used the NLRB's stance on the Boeing plant to accuse President Obama of being too friendly with unions. Republican Sens. Lamar AlexanderLamar AlexanderOvernight Regulation: Appeals court upholds injunction on Trump travel ban | GOP bill would scrap 'micro-unions' Republicans introduce bill to scrap 'micro-unions' Overnight Healthcare: CBO fallout | GOP senators distance themselves from House bill | Trump budget chief blasts score | Schumer says House bill belongs 'in the trash' MORE of Tennessee and Lindsey GrahamLindsey GrahamSenate panel could pass new Russia sanctions this summer Overnight Cybersecurity: Bad Russian intel may have swayed Comey's handling of Clinton probe | Apple sees spike in data requests | More subpoenas for Flynn | DOJ's plan for data warrants Overnight Finance: GOP bill would leave 23M more uninsured, says CBO | Trump aides defend budget | Mnuchin asks for clean debt hike before August | Ryan says House could pass bill without border tax MORE of South Carolina responded by saying they plan to introduce legislation this week that would strengthen the protection of right-to-work laws.

Luttig's full letter can be read here.