Romney campaign: Obama auto bailout ads an 'attempt to distract' from economy

Neither of the ads released Thursday by Obama's reelection campaign mention Romney, whom Democrats have repeatedly criticized for writing an op-ed in 2008 as the auto bailouts were first being considered that was titled "Let Detroit Go Bankrupt."

In one of the 30-second ads, called "Success," Obama argues that the bailouts were unpopular, but good for the U.S. economy. 

"The decision to intervene with the auto industry was not popular, but I was convinced it was the right thing to do," the president says in the commercial. "It wasn't just the million jobs that were at stake. It was what built our middle class — creating products stamped with those words 'made in America.'

"What happened in Detroit can happen in all sorts of communities where when you combine American innovation with the best workers in the world, you can succeed," Obama continued in the ad.

In a second ad released Thursday, called "Brian," a man identified as an Ohio automaker says he would not be working today if Obama had not "stuck his neck out for us" in the auto industry.

"He wasn't going to let it just die," the man says at the end of the commercial. "I'm driving in [to work] this morning because of that, because of him."

Asked about Romney's recent comments about the auto bailout in an interview with ABC News this week, Obama labeled the suggestion that Romney deserves credit for the auto bailout "one of his Etch A Sketch moments.

"I don't think anybody takes that seriously. People remember his position, which was, 'Let's let Detroit go bankrupt.' Had we listened to his advice at that time, GM and Chrysler would have gone under and we would have lost probably a million jobs throughout the Midwest," Obama told ABC News.

Obama's advertisements can be watched below: