New regs for Friday: GMOs, Chinese apples, vineyards

Friday's edition of the Federal Register contains new rules for people with mental health problems, genetically modified organisms, apples from China, and vineyards.

Here's what is happening:

Mental health: The Department of Education is moving forward with plans to help young adults with serious mental health issues integrate into society.

The Education Department's National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research (NIDRR) announced two priorities Thursday to help young people with mental health conditions find jobs and homes.

"We intend these priorities to contribute to improved outcomes in the transition to employment and community living and participation for youth and young adults with serious mental health conditions (SMHC) resulting in psychiatric disability," the agency wrote.

The rules go into effect in 30 days.

Genetically modified organisms: The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) is backing down from a GMO disclosure rule.

The USDA's Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) proposed sharing information about genetically engineered organisms, also known as genetically modified organisms or GMOs, that it received from businesses with state and local agencies, but withdrew the rule on Thursday.

Apples: The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) is considering lifting the import restrictions on Chinese apples, the agency said Thursday.

The USDA's Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) proposed stringent new regulations that would pave a way for fresh apples from China to be sold in the U.S., despite identifying 21 pests that could be problematic to crops here.

The public has 60 days to comment.

Vaccines: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is considering new recommendations for pharmaceutical companies to electronically submit postmarketing safety reports on vaccines.

The FDA issued a draft guidance Thursday that if finalized would explain the agency's current thinking on the matter.

The public has 60 days to comment.

Wine: The Bureau of Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade is establishing two new viticultural areas for winemakers on the southeastern and western coasts, the agency announced Thursday.

The first viticultural area covers nearly 45,000 acres of vineyards in portions of Los Angeles County. The second covers 690 square miles in North Carolina and Georgia.

The bureau designates viticultural areas around the country so winemakers can describe where their wine comes from on wine labels and in advertisements for their wine. 

The rules go into effect in 30 days.