New regs for Tuesday: Car safety, vehicle theft, energy conservation

Tuesday's edition of the Federal Register contains new rules for police officers dealing with domestic violence, car safety requirements for foreign-imported vehicles and energy conservation standards for gas compressors and computers.

Here's what is happening:

Domestic violence: The Department of Justice is considering changes to a program that discourages domestic violence and dating violence.

The Justice Department's Office on Violence Against Women on Monday proposed rules intended to improve the police response to cases of domestic violence, dating violence, stalking and sexual assault.

The public has 60 days to comment.

Car safety: The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) is moving forward with changes to a rule that requires foreign cars imported to the U.S. to comply with federal motor vehicle safety standards.

The changes go into effect immediately.

Grand Theft Auto: The NHTSA says vehicle thefts might have increased by 14 percent in 2012, the most recent year for which data is available.

The NHTSA is publishing a preliminary report that estimates the number of cars stolen for every 1,000 vehicles increased to 1.13 thefts in 2012, up from .99 in 2011. The agency is requesting public comment before it publishes a final report.

The public has 60 days to comment.

Gas compressors: The Department of Energy is looking at new energy conservation standards for gas compressors.

The Energy Department's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy announced Monday that it is considering new rules for commercial and industrial compressors that are used to compress natural gas, because they "may use a substantial amount of energy."

This comes as the Energy Department is already considering energy conservation standards for air compressors, but the new rules would apply to gas compressors.

The public has 30 days to comment.

Computers: The Department of Energy is delaying new energy conservation standards for computer and battery backup systems.

The Energy Department's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy proposed the rules last month, but announced Monday it is extending the comment period through Oct. 2 to give the public more time to consider the proposed rules.