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Business groups put their muscle behind regulatory reform bill

Business groups put their muscle behind regulatory reform bill
© Greg Nash

Business groups are calling on the Senate to pass legislation curbing costly regulations.

The U.S. Chamber of Commerce on Monday sent a letter to members of the Senate Homeland Security and Government Affairs Committee voicing broad support for the Regulatory Accountability Act of 2015.

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The letter, signed by chambers of commerce in Alaska, Arizona, California and Florida, among others, said federal regulations should be supported by strong and credible data and evidence, should be narrowly tailored and should impose the least burden possible.

“Unfortunately, however, because America’s regulatory process was designed nearly 70 years ago, we are now confronted with a growing number of massive, costly, and complex rules that breed uncertainty and stifle hiring and investment,” they said. “These growing regulatory burdens and the uncertainty caused by badly-written regulations are a fundamental concern to us.”

The letter includes signatures from business and trade groups in all 50 states.

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The bill — which was introduced by Sen. Rob PortmanRobert (Rob) Jones PortmanTax rules will be subject to more OMB review under new memo Ending sex trafficking tomorrow requires preventing child abuse today Doctors bristle at push for opioid prescription limits MORE (R-Ohio) and is co-sponsored by Sens. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsSunday Shows Preview: Emmanuel Macron talks ahead of state dinner GOP poised to advance rules change to speed up Trump nominees Overnight Energy: Trump NASA pick advances after drama | White House office to investigate Pruitt's soundproof booth | 170 lawmakers call for Pruitt to resign MORE (R-Maine), Angus KingAngus Stanley KingPompeo lacks votes for positive vote on panel Democrats mull audacious play to block Pompeo Overnight Defense: Trump steps up fight with California over guard deployment | Heitkamp is first Dem to back Pompeo for State | Dems question legality of Syria strikes MORE (I-Maine), Ron JohnsonRonald (Ron) Harold JohnsonGOP senator: Congress needs ‘to move on’ from Russia probe GOP senator: ‘Way too early’ to talk about supporting Trump in 2020 IG report faults fired FBI official McCabe for leak to media MORE (R-Wis.), Kelly AyotteKelly Ann AyotteAudit finds US Defense Department wasted hundreds of millions of taxpayer dollars US sends A-10 squadron to Afghanistan for first time in three years No, the US did not spend million on a gas station in Afghanistan MORE (R-N.H.), John CornynJohn CornynRepublicans divided over legislation protecting Mueller Democrats mull audacious play to block Pompeo Overnight Energy: Senate confirms Bridenstine as NASA chief | Watchdog probes Pruitt’s use of security detail | Emails shine light on EPA science policy changes MORE (R-Texas) and David Perdue (R-Ga.) — would force federal agencies to do a cost-benefit analysis and adopt the least costly or most cost-effective approach when a proposed rule carries an economic impact over $1 billion annually.

The legislation also calls for on-the-record administrative hearings on the most costly regulations and for rules to be more rigorously tested when challenged in court.

The groups said the bill would improve the accountability and the integrity of the regulatory process.

President Obama has already threatened to veto the legislation, which passed the House in January.