House Intel concludes Russia probe interviews: reports

House Intel concludes Russia probe interviews: reports
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The House Intelligence Committee has finished interviewing witnesses as part of its investigation into possible collusion between the Trump campaign and Russia during the 2016 presidential race, a likely sign the probe is coming to an end, according to reports.

Rep. Mike ConawayKenneth (Mike) Michael ConawayHillicon Valley: Deal reached on ZTE, but lawmakers look to block it | New encryption bill | Dems push Ryan for net neutrality vote | Google vows it won't use AI for weapons Lawmakers scrutinize Google, Twitter's relationship with Chinese phone makers Farmland is being consumed by expanding urban areas MORE (R-Texas), who is overseeing the panel's investigation, is expected to announce on Monday that the committee will move on to writing its final report based on the interviews, a source told CNN.

A spokesperson for Conaway declined to comment to the news outlet.

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Democrats have previously said that the Republican-led investigation was not as extensive as they would have liked and that more witnesses needed to be interviewed. They said that the final interviews were rushed and the committee was too lenient in its questioning of witnesses.

While the committee did not interview President TrumpDonald John TrumpEx-ethics chief calls on Trump to end 'monstrous' migrant policies Laura Bush blasts Trump migrant policy as 'cruel' and 'immoral' US denies report of coalition airstrike on Syria MORE, it interviewed some of his closest aides, including former campaign manager Corey LewandowskiCorey R. Lewandowski If Congress takes no action, the Social Security trust fund will become depleted in 2034 Five things to know about the lawsuit against the Trump Foundation New York attorney general sues to dissolve Trump Foundation MORE, former chief strategist Stephen Bannon, Donald Trump Jr.Donald (Don) John TrumpBannon: I don’t believe that Trump says things that are not true Giuliani: 'I doubt' Trump knew Roger Stone met with Russian during 2016 campaign The Hill's Morning Report — 'Sobering' IG report damages FBI MORE and son-in-law and senior adviser Jared KushnerJared Corey KushnerNorth Korea looked to set up communications back channel through Kushner: report Prison reform, peace, and pardons: Jared Kushner's bold and lasting portfolio UK planning international meeting with Kushner to talk Mideast peace plan: report MORE.

Relations between Democrats and Republicans on the House panel have been fraught, with much of the spotlight centering on tensions between committee Chairman Devin NunesDevin Gerald NunesSchiff: ‘Deeply disturbing’ that FBI gave Nunes confidential info on Clinton's emails Gowdy: House will use 'full arsenal' of constitutional weapons to get DOJ, FBI compliance on subpoenas Mueller warns of Russian midterm attack, while Trump attacks Mueller MORE (Calif.) and ranking member Adam SchiffAdam Bennett SchiffWhite House faces growing outcry over migrant family policies Schiff: ‘Deeply disturbing’ that FBI gave Nunes confidential info on Clinton's emails Schiff: White House using migrant kids’ grief and tears to build border wall MORE (D-Calif.). Those partisan tensions came to a head earlier this year with the release of competing memos, one crafted by Republicans and the other by Democrats, concerning alleged surveillance abuses by the FBI and Justice Department.

According to CNN, the committee is expected to produce two reports: a Republican one arguing that no evidence of collusion was found, and a Democratic one making the case for possible collusion and calling for further investigation.

The Senate Intelligence Committee and special counsel Robert MuellerRobert Swan MuellerSasse: US should applaud choice of Mueller to lead Russia probe MORE are currently carrying out their own separate investigations into Russian meddling and possible collusion during the 2016 election.