Wisconsin Republican would sign on to bill to nullify Trump tariffs

Wisconsin Republican would sign on to bill to nullify Trump tariffs
© Greg Nash

Sen. Ron JohnsonRonald (Ron) Harold JohnsonHouse GOP sets three FBI interviews in Clinton probe Overnight Health Care — Sponsored by PCMA — House passes 'right to try' drug bill | Trump moves to restrict abortion referrals House approves 'right to try,' sends bill to Trump's desk MORE (R-Wis.) said on Sunday that he would support a bill that would nullify President TrumpDonald John TrumpComey: Trump's 'Spygate' claims are made up Trump taps vocal anti-illegal immigration advocate for State Dept's top refugee job Seattle Seahawks player: Trump is 'an idiot' for saying protesting NFL players 'shouldn’t be in the country' MORE’s recently announced tariffs, but doubts such legislation would pass.

“I would, but I doubt it would have any chance of passing or, even if it passed, that we would have the votes to override the veto,” Johnson told CNN’s “State of the Union” when asked about supporting legislation to nullify the tariffs.

Sen. Jeff FlakeJeffrey (Jeff) Lane FlakeOvernight Energy: Reporters barred from Day 2 of EPA summit | Dems blame Trump for gas price increases | Massachusetts to get new offshore wind farm Jeff Flake: Trump has 'debased' the presidency Senate Democrats look for traction on gas prices MORE (R-Ariz.) said last week that he will introduce legislation that would revoke Trump’s steel and aluminum tariffs.

Johnson on Sunday noted that people in his home state of Wisconsin were becoming more confident in the economy because of Trump's recent moves to reduce regulations.

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We made American businesses more competitive.  We gave real tax cuts to Wisconsinites and Americans,” Johnson said. “There's really growing level of optimism because we're returning certainty to the American and Wisconsin economy.”

The senator said, however, that the tariffs and talk of ending the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) have made people uncertain about their economic future.

“And the talk of canceling NAFTA and now imposing these steel tariffs have just interjected uncertainty into the economy, where it just wasn't necessary,” Johnson said. "So, I'm really concerned that this is counterproductive, as well as you could really result in retaliatory actions by our trade partners.”

Trump announced last Thursday that he would be placing a 25 percent tariff on imported steel and a 10 percent tariff on imported aluminum.

Mexico, Canada and Australia have been exempted from the tariffs and Trump has signaled that exemptions might be available to other nations.