Dems want info on Labor Dept hiding unfavorable report on impacts of tip-pooling rule

Dems want info on Labor Dept hiding unfavorable report on impacts of tip-pooling rule
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House Democrats are giving Labor Secretary Alexander AcostaRene (Alex) Alexander AcostaThere are now more job openings than unemployed workers in the US Flexible pay keeps opportunities open for disabled workers Dems demand end to waivers used to pay people with disabilities below minimum wage MORE until Monday to hand over the agency’s economic analysis for its proposed tip-pooling rule.

In a letter Friday, Democratic Reps. Bobby ScottRobert (Bobby) Cortez ScottHouse Dems demand answers from HHS on DOJ's ObamaCare decision Overnight Health Care — Sponsored by PCMA — DOJ move against ObamaCare sets off frenzy Dems blast DOJ for 'stunning attack on the rule of law' in ObamaCare case MORE (Va.), Keith EllisonKeith Maurice EllisonVoters should keep eye on 2018 races for state attorneys general On The Money: Judge approves AT&T-Time Warner merger opposed by Trump | Effort to kill Trump tariffs blocked in Senate | Kudlow in hospital after heart attack | Panel advances Fed nominees Ellison introduces bill to curb stock buybacks MORE (Minn.), Mark TakanoMark Allan TakanoHouse panel advances major VA reform bill Spending bill prevents employers from pocketing tips under tip-pooling rule Veterans Health Administration needs stronger recruitment methods MORE and Suzanne BonamiciSuzanne Marie BonamiciLawmakers, media serve up laughs at annual 'Will on the Hill' Congress — when considering women’s health, don’t forget about lung cancer Overnight Energy: Two top Pruitt aides resign at EPA | 17 states sue EPA over car emissions rules | Volkswagen to pay West Virginia .5M over emissions cheating MORE (Ore.) asked for any and all economic analyses on the effects of the proposed rule and information on who at the Department of Labor was allegedly involved in hiding the findings.

The letter comes after Bloomberg Law reported this week that senior department officials intentionally withheld a report showing workers could lose billions if the agency changes the Fair Labor Standards Act to allow employers to pool tips. The rule would apply to workers who make at least the federal minimum wage — $7.25 an hour — and share them with non-tipped workers.

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In the letter, the lawmakers asked for a copy of each and every draft, interim, proposed or completed economic analysis prepared or procured by the commission that’s related to the proposed rule.

They also asked for a list of all the meetings held to discuss whether to include or exclude the analysis and the names of Labor Department officials involved in those meetings.

Workers' rights advocates have been arguing since the rule was first proposed that it would allow employers to pocket a portion of the tips workers receive. 

Workers who make less than the federal minimum wage and earn tips to supplement their pay were not part of the proposal.