Feinstein: Kids should not be BPA ‘guinea pigs’

The legislation also would direct the Department of Health and Human Services to conduct a safety assessment of the container that contain the endocrine-disrupting chemical known as BPA, which has been linked health risks, especially in young children.

“Scientific evidence continues to mount that BPA exposure is a risk to human health, especially for children. Therefore, it is essential that consumers know what chemicals are in the products they purchase,” Feinstein said. “Our children should not be used as guinea pigs by chemical companies when their parents are left in the dark about these harmful products.”
 
The bill requires labels on any food products with BPA, reading: “This food packaging contains BPA, an endocrine-disrupting chemical.”

Rep. Edward MarkeyEdward (Ed) John MarkeyHillicon Valley: Lawmakers target Chinese tech giants | Dems move to save top cyber post | Trump gets a new CIA chief | Ryan delays election security briefing | Twitter CEO meets lawmakers Twitter CEO meets with lawmakers to talk net neutrality, privacy Senate votes to save net neutrality rules MORE (D-Mass) introduced similar legislation last week in the House.