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Cruz offers bill to weaken labor board's power

Cruz offers bill to weaken labor board's power
© Greg Nash

Republican Senator Mike LeeMichael (Mike) Shumway LeeRubio on push for paid family leave: ‘We still have to work on members of my own party’ National ad campaign pushes Congress to pass legislation lowering drug prices Senate Republicans call on Trump to preserve NAFTA MORE (Utah) wants to strip the nation’s labor board of its authority to hear labor disputes and issue rules. 

Lee introduced the Protecting American Jobs Act on Thursday to transfer the power of the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) to hear labor disputes to federal courts.

“For far too long the NLRB has acted as judge, jury, and executioner, for labor disputes in this country,” Lee said in a statement.

“The havoc they have wrought by upsetting decades of established labor law has cost countless jobs. This common-sense legislation would finally restore fairness and accountability to our nation’s labor laws."

The bill, co-sponsored by Sens. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzSasse statement: Trump nominee who spread conspiracy theories has a ‘tinfoil hat’ Coalition of 44 groups calls for passage of drug pricing bill For the sake of our democracy, politicians must stop bickering MORE (R-Texas), James Lankford (R-Okla.), Tom CottonThomas (Tom) Bryant CottonThis week: Trump delivers State of the Union amid immigration fight Ingraham: White House yanked immigration plan defense from show After shutdown surrender, why should progressives ever trust Chuck Schumer again? MORE (R-Ark.), Luther Strange (R-Ala.) and Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioTrump must send Russia powerful message through tougher actions McCain, Coons immigration bill sparks Trump backlash Taking a strong stance to protect election integrity MORE (R-Fla.), also strips the board of its rulemaking power.

“Such rulemaking authority shall be limited to rules concerning the internal function of the board,” the bill says.

“The board shall not promulgate rules or regulations that affect the substantive or procedural rights of any person, employer, employee, or labor organization, including rules and regulations concerning unfair labor practice and representation elections.”

NLRB — responsible for enforcing workers’ collective bargaining rights and fair labor practices — issued a controversial rule and several contentious rulings during the Obama administration.

In 2014, it issued a rule to speed up union elections and a year later issued a ruling in a labor dispute that changed the definition of a joint-employer. Business groups have fought the change ever since, claiming it unfairly makes business owners jointly liable for labor law violations committed by their subcontractors and franchisors responsible for their franchisees.