CMOR (Council on Marketing and Opinion Research)

CMOR_logo.gifCMOR is a 501(c)(6) non-profit organization which works on behalf of the survey research industry to improve respondent cooperation in research and to promote positive legislation and prevent restrictive legislation which could impact the survey research industry. CMOR members are more than 150 organizations, including industry trade associations, research providers, end users or client companies, academic institutions and individuals. CMOR members work together to protect the integrity of the marketing and opinion research process by improving respondent cooperation, improving the research process, and positively impacting privacy and other legislation related to survey research.

Automated and Recorded Voice Polling and Political “Robocalls”

Consumer concern about annoying or un- or mis-identified automated political calls (aka,
“robocalls”), especially in a presidential election year, has driven some legislators and
regulators to seek to curtail such calls. Legislation intended to protect consumers from
unwanted automated calls (by requiring extra disclosures or adding such calls to a state or
national Do Not Call Registry) may inadvertently circumscribe legitimate survey and
opinion research calls (which merely seek to elicit public opinion about candidates,
issues, and policies).

Research Incentives for Healthcare Professionals

Concern about pharmaceutical and medical device companies gaining influence with health care professionals through various kinds of “gifts” has driven interest in Congress and state legislatures in either: (1) requiring the reporting of such “gifts”; or (2) banning all such gifts over a certain dollar amount (usually $25-50). While some legislation exempts incentives/honoraria for participation in marketing research studies, most bills unfortunately include this common research practice in their definitions of “gifts”.  
 
When not banning incentives outright, these bills require various different kinds of disclosure, from simply the aggregate amount of money spent on “marketing” to healthcare providers, to full personally identifiable information about every healthcare professional that receives any gift or money from a pharmaceutical or medical device company.

Wireless Service Taxes

One-in-six Americans have abandoned their landlines for their cellular phones, according
to June 2007 NCHS data. A further one-in-eight Americans receive all or almost all calls
on their cellular phones despite having a landline in the home. Wireless costs have dropped nearly 80 percent over the last 10 years, but the typical wireless consumer now faces over 15 percent on average in taxes, fees and surcharges on his or her wireless service, more than twice the average tax rate for other goods and services in this country.

Universal Service Fees and Telephone Research

    The Universal Service fee (USF) funds a variety of useful programs for rural and low-income
telecommunications, paid for by fees assessed on telecom companies, which the companies then
pass through to telephone users. The USF “Contribution Factor”, which is the percentage of
interstate end-user revenue that telecom companies must pay, changes quarterly depending on
the needs of the programs, as determined by the Universal Service Administrator's quarterly
filings with the Federal Communications Commission (FCC). In the 2nd quarter of 2000 the
Universal Service Fee was 5.7%, but has since grown to 11.3% (in the 2nd quarter of 2008).

Malicious Software: Spyware, Adware and Malware

In the normal course of computer use, data is exchanged with remote servers. Usually
bundled with free programs or surreptitiously downloaded onto a computer, programs known
as “spyware” gather and report information about a computer user without the user's consent
or knowledge. Similar applications called “adware” deliver pop-up advertisements; programs
called “malware” alter personal computer settings and can significantly harm a computer.  
 
Conversely, cookies, which are small, innocuous text strings downloaded from Web sites
into temporary folders, track users anonymously and may save provided information, login
information, for a user's benefit.

Emergency Funding for the 2010 Census

The decennial census is the premier source of demographic and economic data on every facet of
our nation’s population and communities. It provides data used by federal and state agencies to
determine the allocation of hundreds of billions of dollars in government funding and by the
private sector to inform key investment and other business decisions. Further, census population
numbers are used to apportion seats in Congress, influencing the foundation of our democracy.

Funding for the U.S. Census

The Census Bureau is the premier source of demographic and economic data on every facet of
our nation’s population and communities. The agency produces annual data that are used by
federal and state agencies to determine the allocation of hundreds of billions of dollars in
government funding and by the private sector to inform key investment and other business
decisions. Further, census population numbers are used to apportion seats in Congress,
influencing the foundation of our democracy.