National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse (CASA) at Columbia University, The

casarevisedlogo.jpgThe National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse (CASA) at Columbia University is the only nation-wide organization that brings together under one roof all the professional disciplines needed to study and combat abuse of all substances – alcohol, nicotine as well as illegal, prescription and performance enhancing drugs – in all sectors of society.  Founded in 1992 by Former U.S. Secretary of Health, Education, and Welfare Joseph A. Califano, Jr., the nonprofit organization aims to inform Americans of the economic and social costs of substance abuse and its impact on their lives, as well as, remove the stigma of substance abuse and replace shame and despair with hope.

Behind Bars II: Substance Abuse and America’s Prison Population

It is no coincidence that of the 2.3 million inmates in U.S. prisons, 65 percent — 1.5 million — meet the DSM-IV medical criteria for alcohol or other drug abuse and addiction. Another 20 percent — 458,000 — even though they don’t meet the DSM-IV medical criteria for alcohol and other drug abuse and addiction nevertheless were substance involved; i.e., were under the influence of alcohol or other drugs at the time of their offense, stole money to buy drugs, are substance abusers, violated the alcohol or drug laws, or share some combination of these characteristics. This report, Behind Bars II: Substance Abuse and America’s Prison Population, uncovers these troubling facts and, even more disturbingly, finds that the situation has been getting worse since The National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse (CASA) at Columbia University issued its first report on this subject, Behind Bars, just over a decade ago.

National Survey of American Attitudes on Substance Abuse XIV: Teens and Parents

This 14th annual “back-to-school survey” continues the unique effort of The National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse (CASA) at Columbia University to track attitudes of teens and those, like parents, who influence them. Over a decade and a half, through this survey we have identified factors that increase or decrease the likelihood of teen substance abuse. Armed with this knowledge, parents, teachers, clergy, coaches and other responsible adults have been better able to help our nation’s teens grow up drug free.