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Obama joins Jimmy Fallon in 'slow jam' of the news

"I'm President Barack Obama and I too want to slow-jam the news," said Obama to an uproarious crowd during a special taping of the late-night show at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

The president, who kicked off his three-college tour aimed at appealing to young voters in North Carolina, used the slow-jam segment to continue to urge Congress to prevent interest rates on subsidized student loans from doubling to 6.8 percent this summer.

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"On July 1st of this year interest rates on Stafford student loans, the same loans that many of you use to pay for college, are set to double. That means some hardworking student will be paying about $1,000 extra just to get their education, so I've called on Congress to prevent this from happening. What we said is simple — now is not the time to make school more expensive for our young people," Obama said over the slow-jam beat.

"Aww, yeah, you should listen to the president — or as I like to call him, Preezy of the United Steezy," added Fallon.

Obama had a similar message for students during a speech prior to the Jimmy Fallon appearance, at the university, where he sought to put himself in their shoes, telling a crowd of college students that he only paid off his student loans eight years ago.

He even got in a dig at Republicans during his slow jam, and made a subtle pitch for his "Buffett Rule" tax proposal.

"Now, there's some in Congress who disagree. They think keeping the interest rate low isn't the way to help our students. They say we should be doing everything we can to pay down our national debt. Well, so long as it doesn't include taxing billionaires," Obama said.

Fallon ended the segment by telling the crowd, "That is how we slow-jam the news."

"Oh, yeah," responded Obama.

Click here for more on Obama's interview with Fallon, including his thoughts on the Secret Service scandal.

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