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Romney campaign unveils first TV ad for swing-state Wisconsin

Mitt Romney's campaign on Sunday unveiled its first television ad for Wisconsin, targeting President Obama on the economy.

The ad is the latest in a series titled "A better future" which are set to air in key battleground states.

The video opens with a clip of Romney from his Tampa, Fla. GOP convention address. 

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"This president can ask us to be patient. This president can tell us it was someone else’s fault. But this president cannot tell us that you’re better off today than when he took office," says Romney.

"Here in Wisconsin, we’re not better off under President Obama," says the ad's narrator, highlighting $3 billion a day added to the nation's debt.

The ad then touts the "Romney plan for Wisconsin." 

"Cut government spending, eliminate the deficit, create over 240,000 new jobs for Wisconsin," pledges the narrator.

Wisconsin is one of 12 key swing-states that will be crucial in determining the outcome of the 2012 election. While the state has not voted for a Republican presidential ticket since 1984, the new ad buy suggests the Romney camp believes they have a chance to capture the state, the home of GOP vice presidential nominee Rep. Paul Ryan (R-Wis.) this November. 

Recent polls show President Obama with a slight edge in Wisconsin with a CBS/New York Times/Quinnipiac poll last month showing him up on Romney with 49 percent support to 47 among likely voters and a Marquette University poll showing the president holding a 49 to 46 edge. 

A Public Policy Polling survey last month, though, showed Romney ahead with 48 percent support to 47. 

Having officially accepted his party's nomination in late August, Romney is now able to tap Republican party funds and has launched an ad blitz with two months left before election day.

Fifteen other ads in the “better future” series are already on the air in Colorado, Florida, Ohio, Iowa, North Carolina, New Hampshire, Nevada and Virginia. 

Ads in other states also promise to create a specific number of jobs, ranging from 100,000 in Nevada and 200,000 in Colorado to 340,000 in Virginia and 350,000 in North Carolina.