Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonHillary Clinton on US leading in coronavirus cases: Trump 'did promise "America First"' Democratic fears rise again as coronavirus pushes Biden to sidelines Clintons send pizza to NY hospital staff treating coronavirus MORE praised Maryland Gov. Martin O'Malley (D), a potential presidential primary challenger, a week after she used a similar tactic at a rally with Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.).

Clinton was speaking at the University of Maryland at a campaign event for Democratic gubernatorial candidate Anthony Brown, who is currently lieutenant governor under O'Malley. Clinton had strong praise for their record.

"For the past eight years, you’ve had a great team, the O’Malley-Brown administration," Clinton said.

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In a nod to O'Malley's guitar playing, Clinton added, "I don’t know if Anthony plays an instrument, but your current governor does. And so he's gotten the Legislature and the people to kind of sing-a-long for eight years, and the melody has been terrific."

She then praised measures O'Malley has championed, such as increasing the state's minimum wage to $10.10 an hour, and a ban on assault weapons and high-capacity magazines, both of which he signed. 

"Under this administration, there are more good-paying jobs and fewer layoffs, the minimum wage is up and crime is down, common-sense gun safety reforms are saving lives, and everyone in Maryland shares marriage equality, no matter who they are or who they love," Clinton said. 

O'Malley's praise of Clinton was more restrained. "She has served our country so very well as first lady, as United States senator, and as our secretary of State," he said. 

Giving a warm-up speech, he later called Brown and Clinton "the people you've come here to see" and chanted their names.

This is the second time in two weeks that Clinton has appeared at a rally with a potential primary challenger, and the second time she has given praise. Last Friday, she called Warren a "passionate champion for working people." 

O'Malley has indicated he is more likely to run than Warren, who denies she will do so. O'Malley has traveled to the key states of Iowa and New Hampshire, though he remains far behind in polls of Democratic voters. 

As has happened at previous rallies during Clinton's midterm campaigning, her speech was interrupted by immigration protestors. Several groups called out at different points in the speech. 

"I was getting to the DREAM Act," Clinton said in response, adding that she is a supporter of immigration reform. 

O'Malley was seen as moving to Clinton's political left when there was a surge of unaccompanied children at the border this summer, when he opposed sending children back to "certain death."

Clinton, on the other hand, had told CNN, “They should be sent back as soon as it can be determined who responsible adults in their families are."