Sen. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzOvernight Defense: Erdoğan gets earful from GOP senators | Amazon to challenge Pentagon cloud contract decision in court | Lawmakers under pressure to pass benefits fix for military families Erdoğan gets earful from GOP senators at White House Senators confirm Erdoğan played 'propaganda' video in White House meeting MORE (R-Texas) is having a bipartisan Christmas.

He told TMZ that he was given Sen. Tammy BaldwinTammy Suzanne BaldwinIt's time for Congress to establish a national mental health crisis number The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Better Medicare Alliance - Dems unveil impeachment measure; Vindman splits GOP The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Better Medicare Alliance - Dems shift strategy on impeachment vote MORE (D-Wis.) for this year’s secret Santa gift exchange in the SEnate.

“She likes cooking, so I gave her a Texas cookbook,” he said.

He was the secret Santa for Sen. Mark BegichMark Peter BegichAlaska political mess has legislators divided over meeting place Former GOP chairman Royce joins lobbying shop Lobbying world MORE (D-Alaska), he said, who got him a selection of foods from Alaska.

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Cruzo said that the senators, like many Americans participating in gift exchanges, were limited by how much they could spend.

“You know, there’s a limit of 15 bucks. Politicians are kind of inherently cheap,” he said.

The Senate’s secret Santa tradition was started in 2011 by Sens. Al FrankenAlan (Al) Stuart FrankenTake Trump literally and seriously in Minnesota Ninth woman accuses Al Franken of inappropriate contact Al Franken to host SiriusXM radio show MORE (D-Minn.) and Mike JohannsMichael (Mike) Owen JohannsMeet the Democratic sleeper candidate gunning for Senate in Nebraska Farmers, tax incentives can ease the pain of a smaller farm bill Lobbying World MORE (R-Neb.). Senators generally give across party lines — the event is meant to encourage bipartisanship at a time of year when members of Congress are generally dealing with tense issues.

That might come in handy this week, as members of both houses try to pass a spending bill and avert a government shutdown.