Sen. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzMichael Bennet 'encouraged' in possible presidential bid: report Biden-Abrams ticket would be a genius media move Families of Kenyan victims seek compensation for Ethiopian Airlines crash MORE (R-Texas) is having a bipartisan Christmas.

He told TMZ that he was given Sen. Tammy BaldwinTammy Suzanne BaldwinOn The Money: Trump issues emergency order grounding Boeing 737 Max jets | Senate talks over emergency resolution collapse | Progressives seek defense freeze in budget talks Dems offer bill to end tax break for investment-fund managers Bipartisan think tank to honor lawmakers who offer 'a positive tenor' MORE (D-Wis.) for this year’s secret Santa gift exchange in the SEnate.

“She likes cooking, so I gave her a Texas cookbook,” he said.

He was the secret Santa for Sen. Mark BegichMark Peter BegichFormer GOP chairman Royce joins lobbying shop Lobbying world Dem governors on 2020: Opposing Trump not enough MORE (D-Alaska), he said, who got him a selection of foods from Alaska.

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Cruzo said that the senators, like many Americans participating in gift exchanges, were limited by how much they could spend.

“You know, there’s a limit of 15 bucks. Politicians are kind of inherently cheap,” he said.

The Senate’s secret Santa tradition was started in 2011 by Sens. Al FrankenAlan (Al) Stuart FrankenMan who threatened to kill Obama, Maxine Waters faces up to 20 years in prison Gillibrand defends her call for Franken to resign Gillibrand: Aide who claimed sexual harassment was 'believed' MORE (D-Minn.) and Mike JohannsMichael (Mike) Owen JohannsMeet the Democratic sleeper candidate gunning for Senate in Nebraska Farmers, tax incentives can ease the pain of a smaller farm bill Lobbying World MORE (R-Neb.). Senators generally give across party lines — the event is meant to encourage bipartisanship at a time of year when members of Congress are generally dealing with tense issues.

That might come in handy this week, as members of both houses try to pass a spending bill and avert a government shutdown.