Sen. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzCrenshaw pours cold water on 2024 White House bid: 'Something will emerge' Garland's AG nomination delayed by GOP roadblocks The Hill's 12:30 Report: Washington on high alert as QAnon theory marks March 4 MORE (R-Texas) is having a bipartisan Christmas.

He told TMZ that he was given Sen. Tammy BaldwinTammy Suzanne BaldwinDemocrats push Biden to include recurring payments in recovery package Biden signs supply chain order after 'positive' meeting with lawmakers Democrats want businesses to help get LGBT bill across finish line MORE (D-Wis.) for this year’s secret Santa gift exchange in the SEnate.

“She likes cooking, so I gave her a Texas cookbook,” he said.

He was the secret Santa for Sen. Mark BegichMark Peter BegichAlaska Senate race sees cash surge in final stretch Alaska group backing independent candidate appears linked to Democrats Sullivan wins Alaska Senate GOP primary MORE (D-Alaska), he said, who got him a selection of foods from Alaska.

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Cruzo said that the senators, like many Americans participating in gift exchanges, were limited by how much they could spend.

“You know, there’s a limit of 15 bucks. Politicians are kind of inherently cheap,” he said.

The Senate’s secret Santa tradition was started in 2011 by Sens. Al FrankenAlan (Al) Stuart FrankenThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Senate Dems face unity test; Tanden nomination falls Gillibrand: Cuomo allegations 'completely unacceptable' Schumer: Allegations against Cuomo 'serious, very troubling' MORE (D-Minn.) and Mike JohannsMichael (Mike) Owen JohannsMeet the Democratic sleeper candidate gunning for Senate in Nebraska Farmers, tax incentives can ease the pain of a smaller farm bill Lobbying World MORE (R-Neb.). Senators generally give across party lines — the event is meant to encourage bipartisanship at a time of year when members of Congress are generally dealing with tense issues.

That might come in handy this week, as members of both houses try to pass a spending bill and avert a government shutdown.