Sen. Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulSome employees' personal data revealed in State Department email breach: report The Hill's 12:30 Report — Trump says Dems inflated Puerto Rico death toll | House cancels Friday votes | Florence starts to hit coast The Hill's Morning Report — Sponsored by Better Medicare Alliance — Facing major hurricane, Trump is tested MORE (R-Ky.), a likely 2016 presidential contender, is calling on Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonTrump to declassify controversial text messages, documents related to Russia probe Hypocrisy in Kavanaugh case enough to set off alarms in DC Clinton: Hard to ignore 'racial subtext of virtually everything Trump says' MORE to return donations to the Clinton Foundation from foreign governments, calling it "unconscionable" given the records of some of the governments on women’s rights. 
 
During a trip to the early-voting state of New Hampshire on Friday, Paul called on Clinton to return funds from Saudi Arabia, Brunei and the United Arab Emirates, he said in an interview captured by The Courier-Journal.
 
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"These are countries with policies that are horrific towards women's rights, and I think it's unconscionable that Hillary Clinton is accepting donations from them," Paul said, noting instances of women raped, given lashes and stoned to death in those countries.
 
"The Constitution says you’re not supposed to take gifts from foreign countries. I think she should return them," Paul told The Washington Post and NH1 News. Asked whether he was calling on the former secretary of State or the Clinton Foundation to return the gifts, Paul said, "Tell me the difference."
 
In New Hampshire on Friday, Paul toured the offices of Dyn, a Manchester-based tech company, and spoke at the Carroll County, N.H., Lincoln Day Dinner to start a two-day visit. Paul has more events scheduled in the Granite State on Saturday.
 
Politicians from across the political spectrum have questioned the donations in light of Clinton's likely presidential campaign, though Bill and Hillary have both defended the practice, which was mostly barred during her tenure at State. 
 
Asked at a United Nations press conference earlier this month about the donations from foreign governments with records of violence against women, Clinton said that those who donate to the group understand its mission.
 
"And I think that we are very clear about where we stand, certainly where I stand, on all of these issues. There can't be any mistake about my passion concerning women's rights here at home and around the world," she said.