Donald TrumpDonald John TrumpWinners and losers from the South Carolina debate Five takeaways from the Democratic debate Democrats duke it out in most negative debate so far MORE holds a commanding lead over his Republican presidential rivals in his home state of New York but would lose the state in a general election, according to a new poll.

Trump holds a 52-point lead over Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzSteyer calls for Senate term limits to pass gun control legislation Cruz targets California governor over housing 'prescriptions' This week: House to vote on legislation to make lynching a federal hate crime MORE, 64 to 12 percent, in the Emerson College poll of likely GOP primary voters in New York, which also shows John Kasich at 1 percent.

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But Trump would lose to both Democratic candidates in the state in hypothetical matchups: Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonDemocratic insiders stay on the sidelines in 2020 race Hillicon Valley: Twitter falling short on pledge to verify primary candidates | Barr vows to make surveillance reforms after watchdog report | DHS cyber chief focused on 2020 The Hill's Campaign Report: High stakes at last Democratic debate before Super Tuesday MORE leads him by 19 points, 55 to 36 percent, and Bernie SandersBernie SandersWinners and losers from the South Carolina debate Five takeaways from the Democratic debate Sanders most searched, most tweeted about candidate during Democratic debate MORE leads him by 17 points, 53 to 36 percent.

Cruz, who's running second to Trump in the GOP race, would similarly face unfriendly terrain in New York, losing by 31 points to Clinton, a former senator of the state whose campaign is based in Brooklyn.

Clinton, who was twice elected as a New York senator, locked up wins in five more states on Tuesday, extending her delegate lead. She's favored by 48 points over Sanders, 71 percent to 23 percent, to win the New York primary on April 19, according to the Emerson poll.

The survey of 768 likely general election voters in New York, which traditionally favors Democrats, was conducted March 14–16 via landlines with a margin of error of 3.5 percentage points.

The survey of 298 likely GOP primary voters has a margin of error of 5.6 points, while the survey of 373 likely Democratic primary voters has a margin of error of 5 points.