Donald TrumpDonald John TrumpGrassley: Dems 'withheld information' on new Kavanaugh allegation Health advocates decry funding transfer over migrant children Groups plan mass walkout in support of Kavanaugh accuser MORE holds a commanding lead over his Republican presidential rivals in his home state of New York but would lose the state in a general election, according to a new poll.

Trump holds a 52-point lead over Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzViral video shows O’Rourke air-drumming to the Who’s ‘Baba O’Riley’ after Cruz debate Five takeaways from Cruz, O'Rourke's fiery first debate NY Times, McCabe give Trump perfect cover to fire Rosenstein, Sessions MORE, 64 to 12 percent, in the Emerson College poll of likely GOP primary voters in New York, which also shows John Kasich at 1 percent.

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But Trump would lose to both Democratic candidates in the state in hypothetical matchups: Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonGraham: There's a 'bureaucratic coup' taking place against Trump Fox News poll shows Dems with edge ahead of midterms Poll: Democrats in position to retake the House MORE leads him by 19 points, 55 to 36 percent, and Bernie SandersBernard (Bernie) SandersFive takeaways from Cruz, O'Rourke's fiery first debate Ben & Jerry’s co-founders announce effort to help 7 Dem House challengers Dems look to Gillum, Abrams for pathway to victory in tough states MORE leads him by 17 points, 53 to 36 percent.

Cruz, who's running second to Trump in the GOP race, would similarly face unfriendly terrain in New York, losing by 31 points to Clinton, a former senator of the state whose campaign is based in Brooklyn.

Clinton, who was twice elected as a New York senator, locked up wins in five more states on Tuesday, extending her delegate lead. She's favored by 48 points over Sanders, 71 percent to 23 percent, to win the New York primary on April 19, according to the Emerson poll.

The survey of 768 likely general election voters in New York, which traditionally favors Democrats, was conducted March 14–16 via landlines with a margin of error of 3.5 percentage points.

The survey of 298 likely GOP primary voters has a margin of error of 5.6 points, while the survey of 373 likely Democratic primary voters has a margin of error of 5 points.