Clinton notches win in Arizona; Sanders claims Utah, Idaho

Hillary Clintonis projected to be the winner of the Arizona Democratic primary, giving her a victory over presidential rival Bernie SandersBernie SandersJoe Biden faces an uncertain path Bernie Sanders vows to go to 'war with white nationalism and racism' as president Biden: 'There's an awful lot of really good Republicans out there' MORE in the most delegate-rich of Tuesday night’s contests.

But Sanders won decisive victories in Idaho and Utah, allowing Sanders to win a few more delegates than Clinton as of 2:50 a.m. Wednesday. With 100 percent reporting, Sanders won 78 percent of the vote in Idaho; in Utah, where only 15 percent of the vote was in, Sanders was leading with 74 percent. 

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But because Democrats award delegates proportionally, that gives Sanders all but a handful of delegates in those states.

In the 75-delegate state of Arizona, Clinton had nearly 60 percent of the vote. Clinton’s victory there further demonstrates her strength over Sanders among minority voters. Roughly one-third of Arizona’s population is Hispanic, according to the Pew Research Center. 

The Associated Press estimates so far that Clinton will gain 41 delegates to Sanders's 20. 

The Clintons have a long history in Arizona. Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonLewandowski on potential NH Senate run: If I run, 'I'm going to win' Fighter pilot vs. astronaut match-up in Arizona could determine control of Senate Progressive Democrats' turnout plans simply don't add up MORE won the state in the 2008 Democratic primaries against then-Sen. Barack ObamaBarack Hussein ObamaDick Cheney to attend fundraiser supporting Trump reelection: report Forget conventional wisdom — Bernie Sanders is electable 2020 Democrats fight to claim Obama's mantle on health care MORE (Ill.). Her husband, former president Bill ClintonWilliam (Bill) Jefferson ClintonThe magic of majority rule in elections The return of Ken Starr Assault weapons ban picks up steam in Congress MORE, pulled off a rare Democratic victory there the during the 1996 presidential election.

Clinton and her allies used their ties to Arizona to their advantage this cycle, with Bill Clinton stumping for his wife before the primary and her campaign locking up support and endorsements from lawmakers.

The state’s leading newspaper, The Arizona Republic, endorsed Clinton on Monday, writing, “She has the mettle to be president. The sound judgment to be commander in chief.”

Sanders scored a smaller win Tuesday, beating Clinton in a landslide in the Utah caucuses. The state only carries 33 delegates, but Sanders could make off with most of them if his large margin holds. 

The majority of Idaho's 23 delegates also will be awarded to Sanders