Former Sen. Rick Santorum (R-Pa.) and Rep. Michele Bachmann (R-Minn.), both rumored 2012 presidential hopefuls, quickly put a spotlight on the Obama administration's decision Wednesday to no longer defend the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) in court.

Santorum issued a scathing statement, labeling the decision "an affront to the will of the people" and Bachmann used it as an opportunity to fundraise, asking supporters in an e-mail to help avoid "a crushing blow to the traditional marriage movement." 

The two are among the most socially conservative in the current crop of rumored GOP presidential hopefuls and have been critical of Indiana Gov. Mitch Daniels's (R) call for a "truce" on social issues heading into the next election cycle.

"President Obama's refusal to defend a law that was overwhelmingly supported on both sides of the aisle and signed into law by a president of his own party is an affront to the will of the people," Santorum said Wednesday in a statement. "This is yet another example of our president's effort to erode the very traditions that have made our country the greatest nation on earth."

Former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee also reacted negatively to the decision Wednesday. At an event hosted by The Christian Science Monitor, Huckabee told reporters he was "deeply disappointed," arguing the Obama administration "is clearly out of sync with the public on this."

Huckabee said given that voters in more than 30 states have rejected gay marriage, "What does the president believe he knows that people in all these other states don't?"

The quick reaction from Santorum, Bachmann and Huckabee stands in contrast to other GOP potential hopefuls, most of whom have yet to react to the decision. Former Minnesota Gov. Tim Pawlenty and former Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin have yet to issue public statements.

Former House Speaker Newt Gingrich and former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney both weighed in on the decision Thursday afternoon.

"The President is replacing the rule of law with the rule of Obama," Gingrich said. "The President swore an oath on the Bible to ensure that the laws be faithfully executed, not to decide which laws are and which are not constitutional."

Romney called the decision "an unfortunate mistake," saying Obama "has an obligation as chief executive to enforce and defend the laws of the nation. He should not abdicate that responsibility based on his own interpretations and personal views."

-Updated at 3:27 p.m.