GOP WH hopefuls: Next president should pick Scalia's replacement
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The next president should pick Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia's successor, say three men hoping to succeed President Obama.

Sens. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzHillicon Valley — Senate panel advances major antitrust bill Senate panel advances bill blocking tech giants from favoring own products Lawmakers press Biden admin to send more military aid to Ukraine MORE (R-Texas) and Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioPut partisan politics aside — The Child Tax Credit must be renewed immediately These Senate seats are up for election in 2022 Lawmakers press Biden admin to send more military aid to Ukraine MORE (R-Fla.) and fellow GOP candidate Ben Carson all said the next president should pick a nominee.

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"Justice Scalia was an American hero. We owe it to him, and the nation, for the Senate to ensure that the next president names his replacement," Cruz said in a tweet

"The next president must nominate a justice who will continue Justice Scalia's unwavering belief in the founding principles that we hold dear," Rubio said.

Carson said it was "imperative that the Senate not allow President Obama to diminish his legacy by trying to nominate an individual who would carry on his wishes to subvert the will of the People."  

He called on the Senate to "stop any attempts to fill this crucial seat" until the next president is elected. 

Scalia, the longest-serving justice on the Court, died Saturday at the age of 79.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellMcConnell says he made 'inadvertent omission' in voting remarks amid backlash These Senate seats are up for election in 2022 WATCH: The Hill recaps the top stories of the week MORE (Ky.) said a nominee should be picked in 2017, signaling he does not want the Senate to consider an Obama nominee.

Democrats, including Senate Minority Leader Harry ReidHarry Mason ReidThe Hill's 12:30 Report - Presented by Connected Commerce Council - Biden faces reporters as his agenda teeters Biden hits one-year mark in dire straits 'All or nothing' won't bolster American democracy: Reform the filibuster and Electoral Count Act MORE (Nev.) and Senate Judiciary Committee ranking member Patrick LeahyPatrick Joseph LeahyThese Senate seats are up for election in 2022 Senate panel advances bill blocking tech giants from favoring own products Former US attorney considering Senate run in Vermont as Republican MORE (Vt.), pushed back, arguing it would be irresponsible for the Senate to wait that long to replace Scalia.