Gerrymandering is as much about shoring up vulnerable incumbents as it is targeting the other party, and with a huge House freshman class and control of the majority of statehouses, the GOP is looking to protect its own.
 
While some Democratic incumbents stand to benefit from redistricting, most of the lucky incumbents are Republicans. Many big states, including New York, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Florida and Washington have yet to finish their redistricting plans — and in all those states incumbents stand to benefit from the new maps. At this point, here are the top 10 House incumbents most likely to benefit from redistricting:
 
10. Rep. Todd YoungTodd Christopher YoungTester: Our forefathers would not have tolerated Trump asking Ukraine to investigate Biden The Hill's Morning Report - Fallout from day one of Trump impeachment hearing Overnight Defense: Trump hosts Erdoğan at White House | Says Turkish leader has 'great relationship with the Kurds' | Highlights from first public impeachment hearing MORE (R-Ind.)
Young beat then-Rep. Baron Hill (D) in a Republican-leaning Southern Indiana district Hill had held from 1999 to 2005 and then again from 2007 to 2011. During redistricting, which was controlled by the GOP, his allies in the state legislature raided next-door freshman Rep. Larry BucshonLarry Dean Bucshon Trump unveils plan to help kidney patients in push to lower health costs House Republican: Disclosing drug prices in TV ads 'doesn't help the consumer very much' GOP lawmaker has 'a lot of concerns' over coverage if ObamaCare is overturned MORE’s (R) district for Republican pockets, shoring up Young and making Bucshon more vulnerable.
 

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9. Rep. Paul RyanPaul Davis Ryan Retirees should say 'no thanks' to Romney's Social Security plan California Governor Newsom and family dress as 2020 Democrats for Halloween DC's liaison to rock 'n' roll MORE (R-Wis.)
The House Budget Committee chairman’s district has trended a bit Democratic in recent years and went narrowly for then-candidate Obama in 2008, making it a swing district. While Ryan has remained personally popular in the district and has topped 60 percent in every one of his reelections, his plan to privatize Medicare had made Democrats hopeful they could make an example of him this year. But Republicans in control of the statehouse rushed through a redistricting plan ahead of the state Senate recalls that made Ryan’s district a few points more Republican. Since then there has been little talk from the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee about targeting Ryan.
 
8. Rep. Gerry ConnollyGerald (Gerry) Edward ConnollyDemocrat unveils bill requiring banks to identify suspicious activity related to guns Brindisi, Lamb recommended for Armed Services, Transportation Committees Overnight Defense: Protests at Trump's NYC Veterans Day speech | House Dems release Pentagon official's deposition transcript | Lawmakers ask Trump to rescind Erdogan invite MORE (D-Va.)
Connelly won a Democratic-trending Northern Virginia seat in 2008 and was expected to cruise to reelection in 2010, but held on by slightly more than 1,000 votes. Republicans hope to push through a redistricting plan that will shore up neighboring Virginia GOP incumbent Rep. Frank WolfFrank Rudolph WolfAfrica's gathering storm DOJ opinion will help protect kids from dangers of online gambling Vulnerable Republican keeps focus as Democrats highlight Trump MORE. In doing so, the GOP would inadvertently also shore up Connolly’s district. If the Republicans can win two seats to take control of the state Senate this November, they will push through their incumbent-protection plan. If not, Democrats hope to tie up the process and let the courts draw the map, which will likely have little impact on Connolly’s district.
 
7. Rep. Sean DuffySean DuffyOn The Money: Trump seeks to shift spotlight from impeachment to economy | Appropriators agree to Dec. 20 funding deadline | New study says tariffs threaten 1.5M jobs Ex-Rep. Duffy to join lobbying firm BGR Trump's defenders are running out of options MORE (R-Wis.)
Duffy won a Democratic-leaning northwest Wisconsin seat that had been held by Democratic Rep. David Obey from 1969 until his retirement this year, and Democrats have him in their crosshairs next cycle. The GOP state legislators helped him out by swapping some more Democratic territory south of his district with Republican areas, making the district a toss-up and giving him a better chance of holding on to the seat.
 
6. Rep. Tim Walberg (R-Mich.)
Walberg, a staunch conservative in a Republican-leaning district, beat a centrist Republican in 2006 en route to winning the seat, but lost it to centrist Rep. Mark Schauer (D) two years later. He then beat Schauer in a rematch by 5 points last election, not a huge margin in such a strong Republican year. The Republicans who controlled Michigan’s redistricting made sure to cut Schauer’s home base out of the district and make it a few points more Republican. Schauer said that he will not run for a rematch because of the new map.
 
5. Rep. Austin Scott (R-Ga.)
Scott beat former Rep. Jim Marshall (D) in 2010 by 6 points in a district that is always more Democratic in presidential years because of higher African-American turnout. Georgia’s Republican-controlled legislature passed a map last week that moves many African Americans to neighboring Rep. Sanford Bishop’s (D-Ga.) district, giving Scott a safe seat.
 
4. Rep. Sanford Bishop (D-Ga.)
Bishop barely held on to his seat last election, winning by just 3 points. But Republicans who desired to shore up Scott also helped Bishop by making the district more heavily African American. He’s unlikely to face another serious threat going forward.
 
3. Rep. Franco ‘Quico’ Canseco (R-Texas)
Canseco beat Rep. Ciro Rodriguez (D) by 5 points in a Republican-leaning but heavily Hispanic district stretching hundreds of miles along the Texas-Mexico border. Republicans were careful when they redrew the district not to bring down the district’s Hispanic percentage in order to avoid violating the Voting Rights Act, which protects minority voters, but craftily switched out high-voting Democratic Hispanic areas with areas that have lower turnout. If the district stands up to legal scrutiny, Canseco will be in a better position heading into next year’s election.
 
2. Rep. Renee Ellmers (R-N.C.)
Ellmers narrowly beat former Rep. Bob Etheridge, a conservative Democrat, by fewer than 1,500 votes last election. Democrats had drawn the district to be as Democratic as possible in 2001, and the GOP has paid them back by taking it from a slightly GOP-leaning district to one that’s more solidly Republican.
 
1. Rep. Blake FarentholdRandolph (Blake) Blake FarentholdMembers spar over sexual harassment training deadline Female Dems see double standard in Klobuchar accusations Lawmaker seeks to ban ex-members from lobbying until sexual harassment settlements repaid MORE (R-Texas)
Farenthold was one of 2010’s biggest surprises — he edged former Rep. Solomon Ortiz (D-Texas) by fewer than 1,000 votes in a heavily Hispanic border district where midterm election turnout is a perennial problem for Democrats. The new GOP map moved his district into white, heavily Republican Corpus Christi. Assuming no Republicans decide to challenge him in a primary and the new map stands up to Voting Rights Act challenges, it will transform Farenthold from an accidental winner into a second-term incumbent in a safe district.
 
A partial list of other incumbents who have been or could be helped: Reps. Raul Grijalva (D-Ariz.), Ken Calvert (R-Calif.), Kevin YoderKevin Wayne YoderFeehery: How Republicans can win back the suburbs K Street giants scoop up coveted ex-lawmakers Kansas Senate race splits wide open without Pompeo MORE (R-Kansas), Justin AmashJustin AmashTrump allies assail impeachment on process while House Democrats promise open hearings soon Hoyer: We are going to move as fast 'as the facts and truth dictate' on open hearings Conway spars with Wallace on whether White House will cooperate with impeachment inquiry after formal vote MORE (R-Mich.), Dan BenishekDaniel (Dan) Joseph BenishekRepublican groups launch final ad blitz in key House battlegrounds Tea Party class reassesses record Michigan Republican to retire MORE (R-Mich.), Joe Heck (R-Nev.), Michael Grimm (R-N.Y.), Steve Chabot (R-Ohio), Mike Turner (R-Ohio), Steve Stivers (R-Ohio), Charlie Dent (R-Pa.), Jim GerlachJames (Jim) GerlachThe business case for employer to employee engagement 2018 midterms: The blue wave or a red dawn? Pa. GOP 'disappointed' by rep retiring after filing deadline MORE (R-Pa.), Pat Meehan (R-Pa.), Mike Kitzpatrick (R-Pa.), Pete Sessions (R-Texas), Frank Wolf (R-Va.), Jaime Herrera BeutlerJaime Lynn Herrera BeutlerGOP lawmakers offer new election security measure GOP group calls out five House Republicans to speak up on Ukraine Dems push to revive Congress' tech office MORE (R-Wash.) and Dave ReichertDavid (Dave) George ReichertLymphedema Treatment Act would provide a commonsense solution to a fixable problem Yoder, Messer land on K Street Ex-GOP lawmaker from Washington joins lobbying firm MORE (R-Wash.).