The National Republican Congressional Committee has moved 11 more candidates to “Young Guns” status, a designation for top-performing candidates.

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The 11 have reached the final tier of a three-tier training and development program meant to groom strong GOP House candidates. It’s the second round of “Young Gun” candidates the committee has announced, bringing the total number to hit that top-tier designation to 21.

“Candidates that reach ‘Young Gun’ status have met a series of rigorous goals that will put them in position to win on Election Day,” said NRCC Chairman Greg Walden (Ore.) in a statement. "Our job as a committee is to help elect Republicans to office that will serve as a check and balance on the Obama administration. These 11 candidates will fight to stop the harmful consequences of ObamaCare, grow the economy, and get Washington’s spending under control.”

Many of the new crop of Young Guns are in top-targeted races and just made it through tough primary fights, like Tom MacArthur, the newly-minted GOP nominee for retiring Rep. Jon Runyan’s (R-N.J.) seat. Other candidates in that same vein include Rick Allen, challenging Rep. John BarrowJohn Jenkins BarrowOn The Trail: The political losers of 2020 Republican wins Georgia secretary of state runoff to replace Kemp The most important runoff election is one you probably never heard of MORE (D-Ga.); Doug Ose, running against Rep. Ami BeraAmerish (Ami) Babulal BeraFormer GOP lawmaker jumps into California recall election Democratic lawmakers propose B hike for State Scars of Capitol attack permeate high-security inauguration MORE (D-Calif.) and Carl DeMaio, challenging Rep. Scott Peters (D-Calif.).

The committee also named Brian Nestande, challenging Rep. Raul Ruiz (D-Calif.); Dan Logue, challenging Rep. John GaramendiJohn Raymond GaramendiBiden to meet with bipartisan lawmakers on infrastructure Colorado presses Biden to reverse Trump Space Command move Report on military aviation crashes faults lack of training, 'chronic fatigue' MORE (D-Calif.); Jeff Gorell, challenging Rep. Julia BrownleyJulia Andrews BrownleyOvernight Defense: Tucker Carlson comments cause military rage | Capitol guard duty questioned | Vet who served in Marine One unit charged in insurrection Voters elected a record number of Black women to Congress this year — none were Republican House Democrats eyeing much broader Phase 3 stimulus MORE (D-Calif.); Darlene Senger, running against Illinois Democratic Rep. Bill FosterGeorge (Bill) William FosterLawmakers demand justice for Adam Toledo: 'His hands were up. He was unarmed' Lawmakers say manufacturers are in better position to handle future pandemics Lawmakers grill NSA on years-old breach in the wake of massive Russian hack MORE; former Rep. Bobby Schilling, challenging Rep. Cheri BustosCheryl (Cheri) Lea BustosGOP campaign chief confident his party will win back House The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by the National Shooting Sports Foundation - At 50 days in charge, Democrats hail American Rescue Plan as major win House Democrats' campaign arm lifts ban on consultants who work for primary challengers MORE (D-Ill.); and Pedro Celis, challenging Rep. Suzan DelBeneSuzan Kay DelBeneNIH reverses Trump administration's ban on fetal tissue research NIH to make announcement on fetal tissue research policy amid Trump-era restrictions To encourage innovation, Congress should pass two bills protecting important R&D tax provision MORE (D-Wash.). All but Ruiz, Brownley and Bustos are largely considered safe at this point in the cycle.

The NRCC also notably gave a nod to Alex Mooney, the conservative pick for Rep. Shelley Moore CapitoShelley Wellons Moore CapitoOn The Money: Moderates' 0B infrastructure bill is a tough sell with Democrats | Justice Dept. sues Trump ally Roger Stone for unpaid taxes OVERNIGHT ENERGY: Trump official delayed releasing information on cancer-linked chemical in Illinois: watchdog | Advocacy groups say tech giants need to 'step it up' on sustainability |  GOP senator: Raising corporate taxes is a 'non-starter' Moderates' 0B infrastructure bill is a tough sell with Democrats MORE’s (R-W.Va.) seat, who defeated the establishment choice in his primary and has been considered by Republicans a possibly weaker candidate in the general election against former West Virginia Democratic Party Chairman Nick Casey.