President Obama has lost nearly 70 seats in the House since taking office and more seats in midterm elections than any president since Harry Truman.

Democrats have suffered a net loss of at least 69 House seats since 2008, with the possibility that Republicans could pick up even more as the final 2014 midterm races are called. 

Senate Democrats have not fared much better, losing a net of at least 13 seats since Obama took office.

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Midterm elections have been brutal for congressional Democrats in the Obama era. The party lost at least 77 seats in the midterms in 2010 and 2014, though they gained back eight seats in 2012.

Obama has already surpassed President Dwight Eisenhower’s tally of 66 midterm losses in the House, according to data published by the Rothenberg Political Report. President Franklin Roosevelt and Truman each lost more House seats during their midterm years.

The 2010 midterms account for the bulk of the losses. In the tumultuous period after the passage of ObamaCare, Republicans picked up 63 seats in a wave election that awarded them control of the House.

The president has not always been a drag on congressional Democrats. His victory over Sen. John McCainJohn Sidney McCainObama book excerpt: 'Hard to deny my overconfidence' during early health care discussions Mark Kelly releases Spanish ad featuring Rep. Gallego More than 300 military family members endorse Biden MORE (R-Ariz.) in 2008 lifted candidates down the ballot, and in 2012 Democrats in the House picked up eight seats as the president defeated Republican nominee Mitt RomneyWillard (Mitt) Mitt RomneyThe Memo: Five reasons why Trump could upset the odds Will anyone from the left realize why Trump won — again? Ratings drop to 55M for final Trump-Biden debate MORE.

On Tuesday, though, House Democrats lost at least 14 seats as the GOP swept to victory in races around the country.

Senate Democrats have lost seven seats so far, and are at risk of having three more slip away.

Sen. Mary LandrieuMary Loretta LandrieuBottom line A decade of making a difference: Senate Caucus on Foster Youth Congress needs to work to combat the poverty, abuse and neglect issues that children face MORE (D-La.) will face a tough runoff in December that is expected to favor Republican Rep. Bill CassidyWilliam (Bill) Morgan CassidyTwo Loeffler staffers test positive for COVID-19 Michigan Republican isolating after positive coronavirus test GOP Rep. Mike Bost tests positive for COVID-19 MORE. Sen. Mark BegichMark Peter BegichAlaska Senate race sees cash surge in final stretch Alaska group backing independent candidate appears linked to Democrats Sullivan wins Alaska Senate GOP primary MORE (D) has yet to concede against Dan SullivanDaniel Scott SullivanAlaska Senate race sees cash surge in final stretch Biden's oil stance jars Democrats in tough races Coordinated federal leadership is needed for recovery of US travel and tourism MORE as votes continue to be counted in Alaska, and in Virginia, Sen. Mark WarnerMark Robert WarnerSenate Intel leadership urges American vigilance amid foreign election interference Intel officials say Iran, Russia seeking to influence election Senate Intel leaders warn of election systems threats MORE (D) leads by a thin margin.

The losses in the Senate could surpass those suffered by Eisenhower in his midterms, when he lost 13 seats. Truman lost a net of 17 Senate seats in his midterm elections.

Republicans and their allies chose to focus much of their messaging on Obama this year, betting correctly that his low approval ratings would doom incumbents like Sens. Kay HaganKay Ruthven Hagan10 under-the-radar races to watch in November The Hill's Campaign Report: Democratic Unity Taskforce unveils party platform recommendations Democrats awash with cash in battle for Senate MORE (D-N.C.), Mark UdallMark Emery UdallThe 10 Senate seats most likely to flip Democratic presidential race comes into sharp focus Democrats will win back the Senate majority in 2020, all thanks to President Trump MORE (D-Colo.) and Mark PryorMark Lunsford PryorCoronavirus poses risks for Trump in 2020 Tom Cotton's only Democratic rival quits race in Arkansas Medicaid rollback looms for GOP senators in 2020 MORE (D-Ark.).

Historically, the incumbent president’s party tends to fair poorly in midterm elections during his second term in office. Before 2014, the president’s party had suffered significant congressional losses in five of the six second-term midterm elections.

Democrats have repeatedly noted that trend to try as they try to explain their election defeats and make the case that the party will come back strong in 2016, when a new standard-bearer will be on the ticket.

They have also pinned blame on Obama, arguing his flagging poll numbers were too much for their candidates to overcome.

“The president’s approval rating is barely 40 percent,” David Krone, Senate Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry Mason ReidThe Hill's Morning Report - Sponsored by Facebook - Justice Barrett joins court; one week until Election Day GOP Senate confirms Trump Supreme Court pick to succeed Ginsburg Democratic Senate emerges as possible hurdle for progressives  MORE’s (D-Nev.) chief of staff told The Washington Post. “What else more is there to say? ... He wasn’t going to play well in North Carolina or Iowa or New Hampshire. I’m sorry. It doesn’t mean that the message was bad, but sometimes the messenger isn’t good.

Exit polls registered high rates of disapproval of Obama among voters on Tuesday. He is scheduled to hold a press conference Wednesday afternoon.