President Obama has lost nearly 70 seats in the House since taking office and more seats in midterm elections than any president since Harry Truman.

Democrats have suffered a net loss of at least 69 House seats since 2008, with the possibility that Republicans could pick up even more as the final 2014 midterm races are called. 

Senate Democrats have not fared much better, losing a net of at least 13 seats since Obama took office.

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Midterm elections have been brutal for congressional Democrats in the Obama era. The party lost at least 77 seats in the midterms in 2010 and 2014, though they gained back eight seats in 2012.

Obama has already surpassed President Dwight Eisenhower’s tally of 66 midterm losses in the House, according to data published by the Rothenberg Political Report. President Franklin Roosevelt and Truman each lost more House seats during their midterm years.

The 2010 midterms account for the bulk of the losses. In the tumultuous period after the passage of ObamaCare, Republicans picked up 63 seats in a wave election that awarded them control of the House.

The president has not always been a drag on congressional Democrats. His victory over Sen. John McCainJohn Sidney McCainEx-McSally aide pleads guilty to stealing over 0K in campaign funds DOJ: Arizona recount could violate civil rights laws Cheney fight stokes cries of GOP double standard for women MORE (R-Ariz.) in 2008 lifted candidates down the ballot, and in 2012 Democrats in the House picked up eight seats as the president defeated Republican nominee Mitt RomneyWillard (Mitt) Mitt RomneyTop female GOP senator compares Cheney ousting to 'cancel culture' Romney: Removing Cheney from House leadership will cost GOP election votes Utah county GOP censures Romney over Trump impeachment vote MORE.

On Tuesday, though, House Democrats lost at least 14 seats as the GOP swept to victory in races around the country.

Senate Democrats have lost seven seats so far, and are at risk of having three more slip away.

Sen. Mary LandrieuMary Loretta LandrieuCassidy wins reelection in Louisiana Bottom line A decade of making a difference: Senate Caucus on Foster Youth MORE (D-La.) will face a tough runoff in December that is expected to favor Republican Rep. Bill CassidyBill CassidyUtah county GOP censures Romney over Trump impeachment vote Amazon blocks 10B listings in crackdown on counterfeits Cassidy on pipeline cyberattack: Congress must equip businesses with defenses against incursions MORE. Sen. Mark BegichMark Peter BegichAlaska Senate race sees cash surge in final stretch Alaska group backing independent candidate appears linked to Democrats Sullivan wins Alaska Senate GOP primary MORE (D) has yet to concede against Dan SullivanDaniel Scott SullivanKerry denies allegations from leaked Iran tapes OVERNIGHT ENERGY: Supreme Court considers whether US should pay for Guam hazardous waste cleanup | EPA eyes reversal of Trump revocation of California vehicle emissions waiver | Kerry faces calls to step down over leaked Iran tapes Kerry faces calls to step down over leaked Iran tapes  MORE as votes continue to be counted in Alaska, and in Virginia, Sen. Mark WarnerMark Robert WarnerFacebook board decision on Trump ban pleases no one Schumer works to balance a divided caucus's demands Senate Intel vows to 'get to the bottom' of 'Havana syndrome' attacks MORE (D) leads by a thin margin.

The losses in the Senate could surpass those suffered by Eisenhower in his midterms, when he lost 13 seats. Truman lost a net of 17 Senate seats in his midterm elections.

Republicans and their allies chose to focus much of their messaging on Obama this year, betting correctly that his low approval ratings would doom incumbents like Sens. Kay HaganKay Ruthven HaganBiden's gun control push poses danger for midterms The two women who could 'cancel' Trump 10 under-the-radar races to watch in November MORE (D-N.C.), Mark UdallMark Emery UdallKennedy apologizes for calling Haaland a 'whack job' OVERNIGHT ENERGY: Haaland courts moderates during tense confirmation hearing | GOP's Westerman looks to take on Democrats on climate change | White House urges passage of House public lands package Udalls: Haaland criticism motivated 'by something other than her record' MORE (D-Colo.) and Mark PryorMark Lunsford PryorBottom line Everybody wants Joe Manchin Cotton glides to reelection in Arkansas MORE (D-Ark.).

Historically, the incumbent president’s party tends to fair poorly in midterm elections during his second term in office. Before 2014, the president’s party had suffered significant congressional losses in five of the six second-term midterm elections.

Democrats have repeatedly noted that trend to try as they try to explain their election defeats and make the case that the party will come back strong in 2016, when a new standard-bearer will be on the ticket.

They have also pinned blame on Obama, arguing his flagging poll numbers were too much for their candidates to overcome.

“The president’s approval rating is barely 40 percent,” David Krone, Senate Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry Mason ReidBottom line Biden's first 100 days is stylistic 'antithesis' of Trump The Memo: Washington's fake debate on 'bipartisanship' MORE’s (D-Nev.) chief of staff told The Washington Post. “What else more is there to say? ... He wasn’t going to play well in North Carolina or Iowa or New Hampshire. I’m sorry. It doesn’t mean that the message was bad, but sometimes the messenger isn’t good.

Exit polls registered high rates of disapproval of Obama among voters on Tuesday. He is scheduled to hold a press conference Wednesday afternoon.