The Republican Party got the results it wanted from Tuesday's primaries — for the most part.

Its first big wins of the night came in South Carolina, where gubernatorial candidate Nikki Haley and congressional candidate Tim ScottTimothy (Tim) Eugene ScottTo boost minority serving institutions, bipartisan Future Act needs immediate action Cruz to oppose Trump appeals court pick The Hill's Morning Report — The wall problem confronting Dems and the latest on Dorian MORE won their respective runoffs easily.

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Both candidates were favorites of the national party and had backing from prominent national Republicans. Haley and Scott also provide the party with racial diversity on the November ballot. Haley will be the state's first female governor if she wins the general election, while Scott would be the first black Republican in Congress in nine years.

"South Carolinians made history today when they nominated Nikki Haley as the state's first woman and Indian-American nominee for governor," said Republican National Committee Chairman Michael Steele in a statement. "And when he is victorious in November, Tim Scott will be the first African-American Republican congressman to represent the Palmetto State in a century."


Republicans also got the candidate they wanted to face first-term Rep. Larry Kissell (D-N.C.), a top GOP target this cycle. Former TV sports anchor Harold Johnson won the runoff and had the backing of the entire GOP congressional delegation from the state.

Johnson will have to recover from a particularly nasty runoff that featured plenty of personal attacks between him and Tim D'Annunzio.

Republicans are also happy with the results of a Democratic race in North Carolina — that state’s Senate primary runoff. Secretary of State Elaine Marshall (D) is now set to face Sen. Richard BurrRichard Mauze BurrLawmakers applaud Trump's ban on flavored e-cigarettes Trump to hold campaign rally in North Carolina day before special House election Hoekstra emerges as favorite for top intelligence post MORE (R) in November.

"There will be a clear contrast for North Carolina voters in November," National Republican Senatorial Committee (NRSC) Chairman John CornynJohn CornynSenators struggle to get spending bills off ground as shutdown looms The 13 Republicans needed to pass gun-control legislation The Hill's Morning Report — Biden steadies in third debate as top tier remains the same MORE (Texas) said in a statement. "Marshall has demonstrated that she will simply serve as another rubber-stamp for President Obama and Harry ReidHarry Mason ReidHarry Reid warns Trump 'can be reelected' Homeland Security Republican accuses Navy of withholding UFO info Poll: 47 percent back limits on Senate filibuster MORE's deeply unpopular, out-of-control spending agenda in Washington, which North Carolinians have soundly rejected."

But it may not be smooth sailing for the GOP. Public Policy Polling analyst Tom Jensen noted that “Marshall has polled closer to Burr” than Democratic candidate Cal Cunningham has in every poll the firm has conducted since August.

And Republicans didn't emerge from Tuesday unscathed.

As expected, Rep. Bob Inglis (R-S.C.) lost his runoff against challenger Trey GowdyHarold (Trey) Watson GowdyRising star Ratcliffe faces battle to become Trump's intel chief Cummings announces expansion of Oversight panel's White House personal email probe, citing stonewalling Pelosi says it's up to GOP to address sexual assault allegation against Trump MORE in what essentially became a referendum on Inglis's vote in favor of the bank bailout.

National Democrats quickly pounced on the loss.

"Like Parker Griffith in Alabama or countless BoehnerJohn Andrew BoehnerBoehner reveals portrait done by George W. Bush Meadows to be replaced by Biggs as Freedom Caucus leader Scaramucci compares Trump to Jonestown cult leader: 'It's like a hostage crisis inside the White House' MORE-Cantor-backed Young Gun candidates across the country, it's increasingly clear that even Republican primary voters reject the brand Republicans have built for themselves," Jesse Ferguson, the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee's Southern regional press secretary, said in a statement.

In Utah, Tea Party favorite Mike LeeMichael (Mike) Shumway LeeExclusive: Kushner tells GOP it needs to unify behind immigration plan Manufacturing group leads coalition to urge Congress to reauthorize Ex-Im Bank Overnight Defense: GOP grumbles after Trump delays military projects for wall | House panel hints at subpoena for Afghanistan envoy | Kabul bombing raises doubts about Taliban talks MORE defeated Tim Bridgewater in the Republican Senate primary. The NRSC was officially neutral in that race, but the committee had initially backed Sen. Bob Bennett (R), who was ousted at the state party convention in May.

The primary turned into an establishment-versus-activist battle, with Sen. Bennett endorsing Bridgewater and groups like the Tea Party Express and FreedomWorks lining up behind Lee.

In a statement early Wednesday morning, the Tea Party Express said it now plans to "devote its full attention ... and resources" to Alaska, where the group is backing attorney Joe Miller's primary challenge to Sen. Lisa MurkowskiLisa Ann Murkowski The 13 Republicans needed to pass gun-control legislation Overnight Energy: Trump administration to repeal waterway protections| House votes to block drilling in Arctic refuge| Administration takes key step to open Alaskan refuge to drilling by end of year Overnight Health Care: Juul's lobbying efforts fall short as Trump moves to ban flavored e-cigarettes | Facebook removes fact check from anti-abortion video after criticism | Poll: Most Democrats want presidential candidate who would build on ObamaCare MORE (R).