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In a Suffolk University-WSVN poll conducted between Oct. 26 and Oct. 30, 49 percent said Republicans were “intentionally stalling efforts to jumpstart the economy to insure that Barack ObamaBarack Hussein ObamaFive takeaways from the first North Dakota Senate debate Live coverage: Heitkamp faces Cramer in high-stakes North Dakota debate Khashoggi prompts Trump to reconsider human rights in foreign policy MORE is not re-elected.” Only 39 percent said they disagreed with that assessment, and 12 percent were undecided

While no lawmakers have come out to directly levy this charge, Democrats have tried to paint Republicans as obstructionist, and frequently cite Sen. Minority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellOvernight Health Care — Presented by Purdue Pharma — Trump says GOP will support pre-existing condition protections | McConnell defends ObamaCare lawsuit | Dems raise new questions for HHS on child separations Poll finds Dems prioritize health care, GOP picks lower taxes when it's time to vote The Hill's 12:30 Report — Mnuchin won't attend Saudi conference | Pompeo advises giving Saudis 'few more days' to investigate | Trump threatens military action over caravan MORE’s (R-Ky.) statement that “the single most important thing is for President Obama to be a one-term president.”

While unveiling his student loan program in Denver last month, the president noted that Republicans in the Senate voted in unison against his jobs bill, and that those Republicans also opposed more narrow legislation to give money to states to hire teachers and first responders, although a handful of Democrats also voted against both procedural motions.

“[The jobs bill] was paid for by asking those who have done the best in our society, those who have made the most, to do just a little bit more, and it was supported by an overwhelming majority of the American people,” Obama said. “But (Republicans) still said no, and it doesn’t make any sense. How can you say no to creating jobs at a time when so many people are looking for work?”

Republicans, and Rep. Paul RyanPaul Davis RyanThe Memo: Saudi storm darkens for Trump The Hill's 12:30 Report — Mnuchin won't attend Saudi conference | Pompeo advises giving Saudis 'few more days' to investigate | Trump threatens military action over caravan The Hill's Morning Report — Presented by the Coalition for Affordable Prescription Drugs — Health care a top policy message in fall campaigns MORE (R-Wis.) in particular, have shot back saying it’s the president’s divisive rhetoric that is “sowing social unrest and class resentment” in the country and making it difficult to legislate.