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In a Suffolk University-WSVN poll conducted between Oct. 26 and Oct. 30, 49 percent said Republicans were “intentionally stalling efforts to jumpstart the economy to insure that Barack ObamaBarack Hussein ObamaPelosi receives John F. Kennedy Profile in Courage Award Romney: Trump 'has distanced himself from some of the best qualities of the human character' Biden calls for unity, jabs at Trump in campaign launch MORE is not re-elected.” Only 39 percent said they disagreed with that assessment, and 12 percent were undecided

While no lawmakers have come out to directly levy this charge, Democrats have tried to paint Republicans as obstructionist, and frequently cite Sen. Minority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellBolton emerges as flashpoint in GOP debate on Iran On The Money: Treasury rejects Dem subpoena for Trump tax returns | Companies warn trade war about to hit consumers | Congress, White House to launch budget talks next week | Trump gets deal to lift steel tariffs on Mexico, Canada Schumer calls on McConnell to hold vote on Equality Act MORE’s (R-Ky.) statement that “the single most important thing is for President Obama to be a one-term president.”

While unveiling his student loan program in Denver last month, the president noted that Republicans in the Senate voted in unison against his jobs bill, and that those Republicans also opposed more narrow legislation to give money to states to hire teachers and first responders, although a handful of Democrats also voted against both procedural motions.

“[The jobs bill] was paid for by asking those who have done the best in our society, those who have made the most, to do just a little bit more, and it was supported by an overwhelming majority of the American people,” Obama said. “But (Republicans) still said no, and it doesn’t make any sense. How can you say no to creating jobs at a time when so many people are looking for work?”

Republicans, and Rep. Paul RyanPaul Davis RyanDebate with Donald Trump? Just say no Ex-Trump adviser says GOP needs a better health-care message for 2020 Liz Cheney faces a big decision on her future MORE (R-Wis.) in particular, have shot back saying it’s the president’s divisive rhetoric that is “sowing social unrest and class resentment” in the country and making it difficult to legislate.