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In a Suffolk University-WSVN poll conducted between Oct. 26 and Oct. 30, 49 percent said Republicans were “intentionally stalling efforts to jumpstart the economy to insure that Barack ObamaBarack Hussein ObamaObama: Fox News viewers 'perceive a different reality' than other Americans Police investigating death of TV anchor who uncovered Clinton tarmac meeting as suicide Ending the same-sex marriage wars MORE is not re-elected.” Only 39 percent said they disagreed with that assessment, and 12 percent were undecided

While no lawmakers have come out to directly levy this charge, Democrats have tried to paint Republicans as obstructionist, and frequently cite Sen. Minority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellBipartisan infrastructure deal takes fire from left and right Jayapal to Dems: Ditch bipartisanship, go it alone on infrastructure The Hill's 12:30 Report: Sights and sounds from Biden's European trip MORE’s (R-Ky.) statement that “the single most important thing is for President Obama to be a one-term president.”

While unveiling his student loan program in Denver last month, the president noted that Republicans in the Senate voted in unison against his jobs bill, and that those Republicans also opposed more narrow legislation to give money to states to hire teachers and first responders, although a handful of Democrats also voted against both procedural motions.

“[The jobs bill] was paid for by asking those who have done the best in our society, those who have made the most, to do just a little bit more, and it was supported by an overwhelming majority of the American people,” Obama said. “But (Republicans) still said no, and it doesn’t make any sense. How can you say no to creating jobs at a time when so many people are looking for work?”

Republicans, and Rep. Paul RyanPaul Davis RyanZaid Jilani: Paul Ryan worried about culture war distracting from issues 'that really concern him' The Memo: Marjorie Taylor Greene exposes GOP establishment's lack of power The Hill's 12:30 Report - Senators back in session after late-night hold-up MORE (R-Wis.) in particular, have shot back saying it’s the president’s divisive rhetoric that is “sowing social unrest and class resentment” in the country and making it difficult to legislate.