Poll: Most Republicans think Trump will win nomination
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A majority of Republican voters believe that Donald TrumpDonald John TrumpSecret Service members who helped organize Pence Arizona trip test positive for COVID-19: report Trump administration planning pandemic office at the State Department: report Iran releases photo of damaged nuclear fuel production site: report MORE will be their party’s presidential nominee, according to a Rasmussen poll released Friday.

The poll found that 57 percent of Republican voters think Trump is likely to win the nomination, up from 27 percent two months ago, when the billionaire businessman officially launched his campaign.

Only 15 percent of Republican voters see a Trump nomination as "not at all likely," down from 29 percent over the same span.

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Among all voters, 49 percent believe Trump will be the Republican candidate for president, up from 23 percent.

Voter confidence in Trump may be a reflection of national polls that have the businessman up by double-digits in the Republican primary.

RealClearPolitics average of polls has Trump leading the primary field with 22 percent support, followed by former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush at 10 percent and retired neurosurgeon Ben Carson at 9 percent. Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker, Sen. Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioTrump administration eyes new strategy on COVID-19 tests ACLU calls on Congress to approve COVID-19 testing for immigrants Republicans fear backlash over Trump's threatened veto on Confederate names MORE (R-Fla.) and Sen. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzTrump administration grants funding extension for Texas testing sites Hillicon Valley: Democrats introduce bill banning federal government use of facial recognition tech | House lawmakers roll out legislation to establish national cyber director | Top federal IT official to step down GOP lawmakers join social media app billed as alternative to Big Tech MORE (R-Texas) are tied for fourth with 7 percent each.

The Rasmussen poll surveyed 1,000 likely voters from Aug. 19-20 and has a 3-point margin of error.